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The official status of the Irish language remains high in the Republic of Ireland. This reflects the dominance of the language in Irish cultural and social history until the nineteenth century and its role in Irish cultural identity. In April 2016 1,761,420 people in the Republic claimed that they could speak Irish, representing 39.8 percent of respondents out of a population of 4,921,500 (2019 estimate). In Northern Ireland 104,943 claimed to be able to speak Irish out of a population of 1,882,000 (2018 estimate). It has been found, however, that while ideological support for Irish is high, actual routine use is very low, and that there is no correlation between personal fluency in the language and the perceived value of Irish as an identity-marker. Nevertheless, the language benefits fro

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  • The official status of the Irish language remains high in the Republic of Ireland. This reflects the dominance of the language in Irish cultural and social history until the nineteenth century and its role in Irish cultural identity. In April 2016 1,761,420 people in the Republic claimed that they could speak Irish, representing 39.8 percent of respondents out of a population of 4,921,500 (2019 estimate). In Northern Ireland 104,943 claimed to be able to speak Irish out of a population of 1,882,000 (2018 estimate). It has been found, however, that while ideological support for Irish is high, actual routine use is very low, and that there is no correlation between personal fluency in the language and the perceived value of Irish as an identity-marker. Nevertheless, the language benefits from the support of activists who continue to use it as a social and cultural medium. On 13 June 2005, Irish was made an official language of the European Union, the new arrangements coming into effect on 1 January 2007. It is, however, the least routinely spoken of all 24 official languages of the European Union. Traditional Irish speakers in the areas known as the Gaeltacht have usually been considered as the core speakers of the language. Their number, however, is diminishing, and they are being replaced in importance by fluent speakers outside the Gaeltacht. These include both second-language speakers and a small minority who were raised and educated through Irish. Such speakers are predominantly urban dwellers. (en)
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  • The official status of the Irish language remains high in the Republic of Ireland. This reflects the dominance of the language in Irish cultural and social history until the nineteenth century and its role in Irish cultural identity. In April 2016 1,761,420 people in the Republic claimed that they could speak Irish, representing 39.8 percent of respondents out of a population of 4,921,500 (2019 estimate). In Northern Ireland 104,943 claimed to be able to speak Irish out of a population of 1,882,000 (2018 estimate). It has been found, however, that while ideological support for Irish is high, actual routine use is very low, and that there is no correlation between personal fluency in the language and the perceived value of Irish as an identity-marker. Nevertheless, the language benefits fro (en)
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  • Status of the Irish language (en)
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