About: Yahya ibn Zikrawayh     Goto   Sponge   NotDistinct   Permalink

An Entity of Type : dbo:Person, within Data Space : dbpedia.org associated with source document(s)
QRcode icon
http://dbpedia.org/describe/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdbpedia.org%2Fresource%2FYahya_ibn_Zikrawayh

Yahya ibn Zikrawayh, also known under his assumed name Sahib al-Naqa ("Master of the She-camel"), was a Qarmatian leader in the Syrian Desert in the early years of the 10th century. Yahya was the eldest son of the Qarmatian leader Zikrawayh ibn Mihrawayh, and a descendant of the seventh Isma'ili imam, Muhammad ibn Isma'il. His name made direct allusion to John the Baptist (known as Yahya ibn Zakariyya in Islam), but he also assumed the title of "Sahib al-Naqa" ("Master of the She-camel") and claimed to be the awaited Mahdi under the name "Muhammad ibn Abdallah". Along with his brother Husayn Yahya established a base of operations at Palmyra. The brothers were successful in gaining the support of many local Bedouin—especially from the Banu Kalb, thus acquiring a potent military force.

AttributesValues
rdf:type
rdfs:label
  • Yahia ibn Zikrawaih
  • Saíbe Alnaca
  • Yahya ibn Zikrawayh
rdfs:comment
  • Yahia ibn Zikrawaih, également connu sous Sahib al-Naqa («Maître de la chamelle»), était un dirigeant Qarmate dans le désert syrien au début du Xe siècle.
  • Saíbe Alnaca (Sahib al-Naqa - lit "mestre da camela", nascido Iáia ibne Zacarauai (Yahya ibn Zakarawayh, foi um líder dos carmatas no deserto da Síria nos primeiros anos do século X.
  • Yahya ibn Zikrawayh, also known under his assumed name Sahib al-Naqa ("Master of the She-camel"), was a Qarmatian leader in the Syrian Desert in the early years of the 10th century. Yahya was the eldest son of the Qarmatian leader Zikrawayh ibn Mihrawayh, and a descendant of the seventh Isma'ili imam, Muhammad ibn Isma'il. His name made direct allusion to John the Baptist (known as Yahya ibn Zakariyya in Islam), but he also assumed the title of "Sahib al-Naqa" ("Master of the She-camel") and claimed to be the awaited Mahdi under the name "Muhammad ibn Abdallah". Along with his brother Husayn Yahya established a base of operations at Palmyra. The brothers were successful in gaining the support of many local Bedouin—especially from the Banu Kalb, thus acquiring a potent military force.
sameAs
foaf:depiction
  • External Image
dct:subject
Wikipage page ID
Wikipage revision ID
Link from a Wikipage to another Wikipage
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
gold:hypernym
volume
prov:wasDerivedFrom
page length (characters) of wiki page
has abstract
  • Yahia ibn Zikrawaih, également connu sous Sahib al-Naqa («Maître de la chamelle»), était un dirigeant Qarmate dans le désert syrien au début du Xe siècle.
  • Saíbe Alnaca (Sahib al-Naqa - lit "mestre da camela", nascido Iáia ibne Zacarauai (Yahya ibn Zakarawayh, foi um líder dos carmatas no deserto da Síria nos primeiros anos do século X.
  • Yahya ibn Zikrawayh, also known under his assumed name Sahib al-Naqa ("Master of the She-camel"), was a Qarmatian leader in the Syrian Desert in the early years of the 10th century. Yahya was the eldest son of the Qarmatian leader Zikrawayh ibn Mihrawayh, and a descendant of the seventh Isma'ili imam, Muhammad ibn Isma'il. His name made direct allusion to John the Baptist (known as Yahya ibn Zakariyya in Islam), but he also assumed the title of "Sahib al-Naqa" ("Master of the She-camel") and claimed to be the awaited Mahdi under the name "Muhammad ibn Abdallah". Along with his brother Husayn Yahya established a base of operations at Palmyra. The brothers were successful in gaining the support of many local Bedouin—especially from the Banu Kalb, thus acquiring a potent military force. From this base they began launching raids against the Abbasid and Tulunid provinces of Syria, with devastating effect. In 902, the Qarmatians defeated the Tulunids under Tughj ibn Juff near Raqqa, and laid siege to Damascus. The city was successfully held by Tughj, and Yahya was killed. Leadership passed to his brother, who assumed the title "Man with the Mole", and led the Qarmatians until his defeat, capture and execution after the Battle of Hama in November 903. Zikrawayh, the brothers' father, also rebelled in 906 near Kufa but was killed in the next year during an attack on the hajj caravan. With these defeats, the Qarmatian movement virtually ceased to exist in the Syrian Desert, although their counterparts in Bahrayn remained an active threat for several decades to come.
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is Link from a Wikipage to another Wikipage of
is Wikipage redirect of
is foaf:primaryTopic of
Faceted Search & Find service v1.17_git93 as of Oct 15 2021


Alternative Linked Data Documents: iSPARQL | ODE     Content Formats:   [cxml] [csv]     RDF   [text] [turtle] [ld+json] [rdf+json] [rdf+xml]     ODATA   [atom+xml] [odata+json]     Microdata   [microdata+json] [html]    About   
This material is Open Knowledge   W3C Semantic Web Technology [RDF Data] Valid XHTML + RDFa
OpenLink Virtuoso version 08.03.3322 as of Dec 9 2021, on Linux (x86_64-generic-linux-glibc25), Single-Server Edition (61 GB total memory, 35 GB memory in use)
Data on this page belongs to its respective rights holders.
Virtuoso Faceted Browser Copyright © 2009-2022 OpenLink Software