Friend of a friend (FOAF) is a phrase used to refer to someone that one does not know well, literally, a friend of a friend.In some social sciences, the phrase is used as a half-joking shorthand for the fact that much of the information on which people act comes from distant sources (as in "It happened to a friend of a friend of mine") and cannot be confirmed. It is probably best known from urban legend studies, where it was popularized by Jan Harold Brunvand.[self-published source?]

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  • Friend of a friend (FOAF) is a phrase used to refer to someone that one does not know well, literally, a friend of a friend. In some social sciences, the phrase is used as a half-joking shorthand for the fact that much of the information on which people act comes from distant sources (as in "It happened to a friend of a friend of mine") and cannot be confirmed. It is probably best known from urban legend studies, where it was popularized by Jan Harold Brunvand.[self-published source?] The acronym FOAF was coined by Rodney Dale and used in his 1978 book The Tumour in the Whale: A Collection of Modern Myths. The rise of social network services has led to increased use of this term. Six degrees of separation is a related theory. (en)
  • FOAF (ang. Friend Of A Friend - znajomy znajomego) - akronim używany w slangu internetowym oznaczający niezweryfikowaną, prawdopodobnie nieprawdziwą historię. Określenie znajomy znajomego wywodzi się od powiedzenia znajomy mojego znajomego powiedział... (pl)
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  • FOAF (ang. Friend Of A Friend - znajomy znajomego) - akronim używany w slangu internetowym oznaczający niezweryfikowaną, prawdopodobnie nieprawdziwą historię. Określenie znajomy znajomego wywodzi się od powiedzenia znajomy mojego znajomego powiedział... (pl)
  • Friend of a friend (FOAF) is a phrase used to refer to someone that one does not know well, literally, a friend of a friend.In some social sciences, the phrase is used as a half-joking shorthand for the fact that much of the information on which people act comes from distant sources (as in "It happened to a friend of a friend of mine") and cannot be confirmed. It is probably best known from urban legend studies, where it was popularized by Jan Harold Brunvand.[self-published source?] (en)
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  • Friend of a friend (en)
  • FOAF (akronim) (pl)
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