Buses in Melbourne, Australia, are a major form of public transport in Melbourne, with an extensive bus network. There are 346 routes in operation with a varying range of service frequencies, (including NightRider, excluding Kew School Services) operated by 32 privately owned bus companies under franchise from the State Government. The NightRider bus system consists of 13 routes and operates on Friday and Saturday nights, and a SmartBus orbital bus network is being set up, currently consisting of 9 routes, which is intended to facilitate cross city travel, while the current network is predominantly a radial network. Most of the bus network is a covered by the myki ticketing system.

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  • Buses in Melbourne, Australia, are a major form of public transport in Melbourne, with an extensive bus network. There are 346 routes in operation with a varying range of service frequencies, (including NightRider, excluding Kew School Services) operated by 32 privately owned bus companies under franchise from the State Government. The NightRider bus system consists of 13 routes and operates on Friday and Saturday nights, and a SmartBus orbital bus network is being set up, currently consisting of 9 routes, which is intended to facilitate cross city travel, while the current network is predominantly a radial network. Most of the bus network is a covered by the myki ticketing system. The Skybus Super Shuttle is a non-myki ticketing airport bus service. There are nine other bus companies serving Melbourne airport, with services to Ballarat, Bendigo, Dandenong, Frankston, Mornington Peninsula, Geelong, Melbourne suburbs, Shepparton and the Riverina. A daily return service from the states north—starting in Shepparton, passing through Nagambie, Seymour and Broadford—is operated by Airport Direct. In addition, several local government councils operate free local community bus services within their local areas. In addition, there are tourist bus services in the CBD and nearby tourist attractions. While the city relies predominantly on an inner-city tram network and radial train network, the outer suburbs of Melbourne are primarily serviced by bus. Melbourne's buses also provide a local feeder to Melbourne's train and tram network. Unlike Melbourne's train and tram networks, up until the 1950s, buses in Melbourne were operated in a largely deregulated free market by private companies. Post World War Two, bus use in Melbourne peaked in 1952-1953 at 157 million passenger trips, but fell in subsequent years to a low of 71.5 million passenger trips in 1980-1981. In the 2013-2014 financial year, a total of 127.6 million passenger trips were recorded on Melbourne's buses, an increase of 10.2 percent on the previous year continuing the trend of recent years, where patronage has now recovered to 1960s levels. (en)
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  • Buses in Melbourne, Australia, are a major form of public transport in Melbourne, with an extensive bus network. There are 346 routes in operation with a varying range of service frequencies, (including NightRider, excluding Kew School Services) operated by 32 privately owned bus companies under franchise from the State Government. The NightRider bus system consists of 13 routes and operates on Friday and Saturday nights, and a SmartBus orbital bus network is being set up, currently consisting of 9 routes, which is intended to facilitate cross city travel, while the current network is predominantly a radial network. Most of the bus network is a covered by the myki ticketing system. (en)
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  • Buses in Melbourne (en)
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