About: Thiocyanate

An Entity of Type: chemical compound, from Named Graph: http://dbpedia.org, within Data Space: dbpedia.org

Thiocyanate (also known as rhodanide) is the anion [SCN]−. It is the conjugate base of thiocyanic acid. Common derivatives include the colourless salts potassium thiocyanate and sodium thiocyanate. Organic compounds containing the functional group SCN are also called thiocyanates. Mercury(II) thiocyanate was formerly used in pyrotechnics. 8 CN− + S8 → 8 SCN−CN− + S2O2−3 → SCN− + SO2−3 The second reaction is catalyzed by thiosulfate sulfurtransferase, a hepatic mitochondrial enzyme, and by other sulfur transferases, which together are responsible for around 80% of cyanide metabolism in the body.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Thiocyanate (also known as rhodanide) is the anion [SCN]−. It is the conjugate base of thiocyanic acid. Common derivatives include the colourless salts potassium thiocyanate and sodium thiocyanate. Organic compounds containing the functional group SCN are also called thiocyanates. Mercury(II) thiocyanate was formerly used in pyrotechnics. Thiocyanate is analogous to the cyanate ion, [OCN]−, wherein oxygen is replaced by sulfur. [SCN]− is one of the pseudohalides, due to the similarity of its reactions to that of halide ions. Thiocyanate used to be known as rhodanide (from a Greek word for rose) because of the red colour of its complexes with iron. Thiocyanate is produced by the reaction of elemental sulfur or thiosulfate with cyanide: 8 CN− + S8 → 8 SCN−CN− + S2O2−3 → SCN− + SO2−3 The second reaction is catalyzed by thiosulfate sulfurtransferase, a hepatic mitochondrial enzyme, and by other sulfur transferases, which together are responsible for around 80% of cyanide metabolism in the body. (en)
dbo:iupacName
  • Thiocyanate (en)
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 1016017 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 14640 (xsd:nonNegativeInteger)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 1025551146 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageWikiLink
dbp:align
  • left (en)
  • right (en)
dbp:caption
  • Resonance structures of the thiocyanate ion (en)
  • The blood-red colored complex [Fe5]2+ , indicates the presence of Fe3+ in solution. (en)
dbp:direction
  • Horizontal (en)
dbp:image
  • Aqueous_ferric_thiocyanate__hydrate_mix.jpg (en)
  • Pentaaquathiocyanatoiron-3D-balls.png (en)
dbp:imagefile
  • Thiocyanate-3D-vdW.png (en)
dbp:pin
  • Thiocyanate (en)
dbp:verifiedfields
  • changed (en)
dbp:verifiedrevid
  • 470607017 (xsd:integer)
dbp:watchedfields
  • changed (en)
dbp:width
  • 200 (xsd:integer)
  • 250 (xsd:integer)
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
gold:hypernym
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Thiocyanate (also known as rhodanide) is the anion [SCN]−. It is the conjugate base of thiocyanic acid. Common derivatives include the colourless salts potassium thiocyanate and sodium thiocyanate. Organic compounds containing the functional group SCN are also called thiocyanates. Mercury(II) thiocyanate was formerly used in pyrotechnics. 8 CN− + S8 → 8 SCN−CN− + S2O2−3 → SCN− + SO2−3 The second reaction is catalyzed by thiosulfate sulfurtransferase, a hepatic mitochondrial enzyme, and by other sulfur transferases, which together are responsible for around 80% of cyanide metabolism in the body. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Thiocyanate (en)
owl:sameAs
prov:wasDerivedFrom
foaf:depiction
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is dbo:wikiPageWikiLink of
is foaf:primaryTopic of
Powered by OpenLink Virtuoso    This material is Open Knowledge     W3C Semantic Web Technology     This material is Open Knowledge    Valid XHTML + RDFa
This content was extracted from Wikipedia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License