About: Border pipes

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The border pipes are a type of bagpipe related to the Scottish Great Highland Bagpipe. It is perhaps confusable with the Scottish smallpipe, although it is a quite different and much older instrument. Although most modern Border pipes are closely modelled on similar historic instruments, the modern Scottish smallpipes are a modern reinvention, inspired by historic instruments but largely based on Northumbrian smallpipes in their construction.

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  • The border pipes are a type of bagpipe related to the Scottish Great Highland Bagpipe. It is perhaps confusable with the Scottish smallpipe, although it is a quite different and much older instrument. Although most modern Border pipes are closely modelled on similar historic instruments, the modern Scottish smallpipes are a modern reinvention, inspired by historic instruments but largely based on Northumbrian smallpipes in their construction. The name, which is modern, refers to the Anglo-Scottish Border region, where the instrument was once common, so much so that many towns there used to maintain a piper. The instrument was found much more widely than this, however; it was noted as far north as Aberdeenshire, south of the Border in Northumbria and elsewhere in the north of England. Indeed, some late 17th-century paintings, such as a tavern scene by Egbert van Heemskerck, probably from south-eastern England, show musicians playing such instruments. Other names have been used for the instrument: Lowland pipes and reel pipes in Scotland, and half-long pipes in Northumbria. However, the term reel pipes historically refers to instruments similar to Highland pipes, but primarily intended for indoor use. While the instrument had been widespread in the 18th century, by the late 19th century it was no longer played. There was an attempt to revive it in North East England in the 1920s and sets were created for Newcastle Royal Grammar School, Durham University OTC and Northumberland Boy Scouts, the term half-long pipes is now used to refer specifically to surviving examples from this period,; these were in part modelled on an 18th century set which had belonged to Muckle Jock Milburn, and is now in the Morpeth Chantry Bagpipe Museum; however, they were given a different drone configuration. (en)
  • La border pipe est une cornemuse proche de la Grande Cornemuse Écossaise. Elle est fréquemment confondue avec le Scottish smallpipes, qui est un instrument différent. Le nom de l'instrument est issu de la frontière anglo-écossaise ("the Border" en anglais), où il était autrefois courant. De nombreuses villes avaient ainsi un joueur de cornemuse officiel. On retrouve la border pipe jusque dans l'Aberdeenshire au nord, et au Northumberland ainsi que dans l'ensemble du nord de l'Angleterre au sud. D'autres noms ont été utilisés : Lowland pipes en Écosse et half-long pipes (litt. « cornemuse semi-longue ») en Angleterre. Ce terme se réfère particulièrement aux instruments des années 1920. Certains l'appellent Reelpipes. (fr)
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  • The border pipes are a type of bagpipe related to the Scottish Great Highland Bagpipe. It is perhaps confusable with the Scottish smallpipe, although it is a quite different and much older instrument. Although most modern Border pipes are closely modelled on similar historic instruments, the modern Scottish smallpipes are a modern reinvention, inspired by historic instruments but largely based on Northumbrian smallpipes in their construction. (en)
  • La border pipe est une cornemuse proche de la Grande Cornemuse Écossaise. Elle est fréquemment confondue avec le Scottish smallpipes, qui est un instrument différent. Le nom de l'instrument est issu de la frontière anglo-écossaise ("the Border" en anglais), où il était autrefois courant. De nombreuses villes avaient ainsi un joueur de cornemuse officiel. On retrouve la border pipe jusque dans l'Aberdeenshire au nord, et au Northumberland ainsi que dans l'ensemble du nord de l'Angleterre au sud. (fr)
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  • Border pipes (en)
  • Border pipe (fr)
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