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Subject Item
dbr:Ranschburg_effect
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Ranschburg effect
rdfs:comment
The Ranschburg effect, sometimes referred to as Ranschburg inhibition, is a psychological theory which refers to the substandard recall of repeated items, or listed items, in a short sequence. According to a 1973 paper in the Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, the Ranschburg effect is interpreted as a result of a restricted guessing strategy that excludes repetitions of remembered items as possible responses. This term is also described as the deterioration in memory performance when items are repeated in a list of items to be remembered. The Ranschburg effect can also be referred to as repetition inhibition, which should not be mistaken for repetition blindness, which refers to the failure or inability to recall repeated items from the short-term memory when sequences are pre
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dbr:Rote_learning dbr:Hungary dbr:Psychopathology dbr:Psychiatrist dbr:Repetition_blindness dbr:Neurology dbr:Behaviorism dbr:Recall_(memory) dbr:Learning dbr:Psychology dbc:Psychological_effects dbr:Gestalt_psychology dbr:Györe,_Hungary dbr:Psychoanalysis n14:Numbers3_4_5_7_8_10_11_12_13_15_17_18.jpg dbr:Sequence
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The Ranschburg effect, sometimes referred to as Ranschburg inhibition, is a psychological theory which refers to the substandard recall of repeated items, or listed items, in a short sequence. According to a 1973 paper in the Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, the Ranschburg effect is interpreted as a result of a restricted guessing strategy that excludes repetitions of remembered items as possible responses. This term is also described as the deterioration in memory performance when items are repeated in a list of items to be remembered. The Ranschburg effect can also be referred to as repetition inhibition, which should not be mistaken for repetition blindness, which refers to the failure or inability to recall repeated items from the short-term memory when sequences are presented rapidly. The Ranschburg effect is named after Hungarian psychiatrist , who reported the phenomenon in 1901. The bulk of studies of the Ranschburg effect use lists that range from 8 to 10 digits with only one repeated element. A study in The Psychology of Ageing: An Introduction found that Ranschburg effect is greater among older than younger adults since it is suggested that the inhibitory processes act against repeating items.
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