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Statements

Subject Item
dbr:Developmental_differences_in_solitary_facial_expressions
rdf:type
yago:Abstraction100002137 yago:FacialExpression106877078 yago:Gesture106876309 yago:WikicatFacialExpressions yago:VisualCommunication106873252 yago:Communication100033020
rdfs:label
Developmental differences in solitary facial expressions
rdfs:comment
Facial expressions are used to communicate emotions. They can also occur solitarily, without other people being present. People often imagine themselves in social situations when alone, resulting in solitary facial expressions. Toddlers and children in early childhood use social cues and contexts to discriminate and recognize facial expressions. They develop at this early stage facial expressions in order to provoke reactions from their caregivers and receive nurturance and support. Children reflect their peers' emotions in their own expressions for social interaction.
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wikipedia-en:Developmental_differences_in_solitary_facial_expressions
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dbc:Facial_expressions dbc:Developmental_neuroscience dbc:Developmental_psychology dbc:Child_development
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41068159
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995251672
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dbc:Developmental_psychology dbr:Toddler dbc:Developmental_neuroscience dbr:Early_childhood dbr:Adolescence n15:Playful_mood_of_children_at_Nepal.jpg dbr:Infant dbr:Smile dbc:Facial_expressions dbr:Preadolescence dbc:Child_development dbr:Facial_expression
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dbo:abstract
Facial expressions are used to communicate emotions. They can also occur solitarily, without other people being present. People often imagine themselves in social situations when alone, resulting in solitary facial expressions. Toddlers and children in early childhood use social cues and contexts to discriminate and recognize facial expressions. They develop at this early stage facial expressions in order to provoke reactions from their caregivers and receive nurturance and support. Children reflect their peers' emotions in their own expressions for social interaction. Facial expression discrimination and expression develop at varying rates in children. During middle childhood and adolescence, the abilities to discriminate and produce facial expressions are still on their way toward achieving full potential. Considering that the ability to discriminate and produce facial expressions develop independently, there is a gap between a child's capacity to discriminate an emotion on another's face and their capacity to produce certain emotions, such as anger or fear. Fear and anger are more difficult expressions to produce than happiness, a possible explanation being that children are socialized not to produce these, considered socially undesirable. Further research is required to fully explore this idea.
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