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The Ingenuity Gap is a non-fiction book by Canadian academic Thomas Homer-Dixon. It was written over the course of eight years from 1992 to 2000 when it was published by Knopf. The book argues that the nature of problems faced by our society are becoming more complex and that our ability to implement solutions is not keeping pace. Homer-Dixon focuses upon complexities, unexpected non-linear results, and emergent properties. He takes an inter-disciplinary approach connecting political science with sociology, economics, history, and ecology.

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dbo:abstract
  • The Ingenuity Gap is a non-fiction book by Canadian academic Thomas Homer-Dixon. It was written over the course of eight years from 1992 to 2000 when it was published by Knopf. The book argues that the nature of problems faced by our society are becoming more complex and that our ability to implement solutions is not keeping pace. Homer-Dixon focuses upon complexities, unexpected non-linear results, and emergent properties. He takes an inter-disciplinary approach connecting political science with sociology, economics, history, and ecology. After Robert D. Kaplan referenced Homer-Dixon's work in the 1994 The Atlantic Monthly article, "The Coming Anarchy", Homer-Dixon was offered a book deal. He spent the next half decade preparing until it was finally published in 2000 in North America and the United Kingdom. While it spent three weeks at #1 on a Canadian best-seller list, it did not sell many copies in the United States. Critics were pleased with Homer-Dixon's scholarship, straightforward presentation, and the book's breadth but some found the writing to have a self-indulgent quality. Homer-Dixon was awarded the Governor General's Award for English language non-fiction in 2001 and the book went on to be translated into French and Spanish. (en)
dbo:author
dbo:dcc
  • 303.48/33 21
dbo:isbn
  • 978-0-375-40186-2
dbo:lcc
  • HM846 .H663 2000
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  • 480 (xsd:positiveInteger)
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  • 44969346
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  • HM846 .H663 2000 (en)
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  • 303.480000 (xsd:double)
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  • 978 (xsd:integer)
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  • Print (en)
dbp:name
  • The Ingenuity Gap (en)
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  • 44969346 (xsd:integer)
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  • 480 (xsd:integer)
dbp:pubDate
  • September 2000 (en)
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  • Knopf
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rdfs:comment
  • The Ingenuity Gap is a non-fiction book by Canadian academic Thomas Homer-Dixon. It was written over the course of eight years from 1992 to 2000 when it was published by Knopf. The book argues that the nature of problems faced by our society are becoming more complex and that our ability to implement solutions is not keeping pace. Homer-Dixon focuses upon complexities, unexpected non-linear results, and emergent properties. He takes an inter-disciplinary approach connecting political science with sociology, economics, history, and ecology. (en)
rdfs:label
  • The Ingenuity Gap (en)
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  • The Ingenuity Gap (en)
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