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Terraforming is well represented in contemporary literature, usually in the form of science fiction, as well as in popular culture. While many stories involving interstellar travel feature planets already suited to habitation by humans and supporting their own indigenous life, some authors prefer to address the unlikeliness of such a concept by instead detailing the means by which humans have converted inhospitable worlds to ones capable of supporting life through artificial means.

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  • La terraformation est un des grands thèmes de la science-fiction. Dans son roman Semailles humaines, écrit en 1957, l'écrivain James Blish la définissait ainsi : « Terraformation : technique consistant à façonner les planètes à l'image approximative de la Terre pour que les Terriens normaux puissent y vivre ». (fr)
  • Terraforming is well represented in contemporary literature, usually in the form of science fiction, as well as in popular culture. While many stories involving interstellar travel feature planets already suited to habitation by humans and supporting their own indigenous life, some authors prefer to address the unlikeliness of such a concept by instead detailing the means by which humans have converted inhospitable worlds to ones capable of supporting life through artificial means. Author Jack Williamson is credited with inventing and popularizing the term "terraform". In July 1942, under the pseudonym Will Stewart, Williamson published a science fiction novella entitled "Collision Orbit" in Astounding Science-Fiction magazine. The series was later published as two novels, Seetee Shock (1949) and Seetee Ship (1951). American geographer Richard Cathcart successfully lobbied for formal recognition of the verb "to terraform", and it was first included in the fourth edition of the Shorter Oxford English Dictionary in 1993. (en)
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  • La terraformation est un des grands thèmes de la science-fiction. Dans son roman Semailles humaines, écrit en 1957, l'écrivain James Blish la définissait ainsi : « Terraformation : technique consistant à façonner les planètes à l'image approximative de la Terre pour que les Terriens normaux puissent y vivre ». (fr)
  • Terraforming is well represented in contemporary literature, usually in the form of science fiction, as well as in popular culture. While many stories involving interstellar travel feature planets already suited to habitation by humans and supporting their own indigenous life, some authors prefer to address the unlikeliness of such a concept by instead detailing the means by which humans have converted inhospitable worlds to ones capable of supporting life through artificial means. (en)
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  • Terraforming in literature and popular culture (en)
  • Terraformation dans la fiction (fr)
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