Slugs' Saloon was a jazz club at 242 East 3rd Street, between Avenue B and C in Manhattan's East Village, operating from the mid-1960s to 1972. The location, in what was then a run-down part of New York City, first hosted a Ukrainian restaurant and bar, and later a bar that served as a meeting point for drug dealers. In 1964, Jerry Schultz opened it as a club and initially called it "Slugs' Saloon", the "slugs" being a reference to the "three-centered beings" and "terrestrial three-brained beings" mentioned in the book Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson by George Gurdjieff. Due to New York City regulations, the word "saloon" had to be dropped from the name. The venue was called "Slugs' in the Far East", due to its easterly location in the East Village. The interior of the club was longer th

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  • Slug’s Saloon (häufig auch einfach Slug’s) war eine der bekannten New Yorker Spielstätten für den zeitgenössischen Jazz der 1960er und der frühen 1970er Jahre. Neben der Jazz Gallery und dem Five Spot entwickelte sich die Bar zu einem der zentralen Auftrittsmöglichkeiten für die damalige Jazz-Avantgarde zwischen dem East Village und Greenwich Village. Slug’s Saloon, der sich an der Lower East Side in 242 East Third Street in Manhattan zwischen den Avenues B und C befand, war einer der populären Jazzclubs im New York der 1960er Jahre. David Izenzon überzeugte 1964 den mit ihm befreundeten Wirt Jerry Schultz davon, dort Jazzmusiker auftreten zu lassen; eine der ersten Bands, die dort spielte, war das Trio von Paul Bley mit Izenzon und Barry Altschul. Weiterhin traten u. a. auf Wayne Shorter, Roy Haynes, Jimmy Heath, Curtis Fuller, Larry Coryell, Jack Bruce, Gil Evans Orchestra, John Coltrane, Ornette Coleman, Charles Mingus, Archie Shepp und Pharoah Sanders. Sun Ra spielte dort seit 1966 mit seinem Arkestra sieben Jahre lang montags; Jackie McLean trat lange Sonntag nachmittags auf. Mitschnitte der Auftritte von Albert Ayler, Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers, Charles Lloyd, Charles Mingus, Charles Tolliver und Sun Ra erschienen auf Tonträger. Die Hausband bildeten Clint Houston, George Cables und Lenny White. Der Trompeter Lee Morgan wurde am 19. Februar 1972 in Slug’s Saloon in der Pause seines Auftritts erschossen. Der Ort von Slug’s Saloon galt in der afroamerikanischen Kultur als geheiligter Ort, beschrieben in The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man (1912) von James Weldon Johnson. (de)
  • Slugs' Saloon was a jazz club at 242 East 3rd Street, between Avenue B and C in Manhattan's East Village, operating from the mid-1960s to 1972. The location, in what was then a run-down part of New York City, first hosted a Ukrainian restaurant and bar, and later a bar that served as a meeting point for drug dealers. In 1964, Jerry Schultz opened it as a club and initially called it "Slugs' Saloon", the "slugs" being a reference to the "three-centered beings" and "terrestrial three-brained beings" mentioned in the book Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson by George Gurdjieff. Due to New York City regulations, the word "saloon" had to be dropped from the name. The venue was called "Slugs' in the Far East", due to its easterly location in the East Village. The interior of the club was longer than it was wide and the bandstand all the way in the back. It could fit 75 people but often held twice that. The bar was on the left side as one entered the venue. The wooden sign that hung outside the venue was carved by James Jackson. During the mid-1960s it slowly started attracting regular jazz performances, developing a reputation as a musician's bar. In this period it became closely associated with free-jazz musician Sun Ra: from March 1966 through late 1967, Sun Ra and his Arkestra (billed as "Sun Ra and His Astro-Infinity Music") played regular gigs every Monday, and continued to play the venue irregularly thereafter. By the late 1960s the club had grown a vibrant scene in its out-of-the-way location, with performances from prominent jazz musicians including Sonny Rollins, Albert Ayler and Ornette Coleman, among many others. Some of these performances were recorded, often surreptitiously, and appear on officially released or on bootleg albums. Audiences included a number of well-known artists and musicians, ranging from Larry Rivers to Paul H. Brown to Bob Thompson and Salvador Dalí. The venue saw the death of Lee Morgan on February 19, 1972, when he was shot at the bar by his common-law wife Helen More. The general demise of the neighborhood and his hard lifestyle as a club owner led Jerry Schulz to leave, and the club shut down in late 1972. (en)
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  • Slug’s Saloon (häufig auch einfach Slug’s) war eine der bekannten New Yorker Spielstätten für den zeitgenössischen Jazz der 1960er und der frühen 1970er Jahre. Neben der Jazz Gallery und dem Five Spot entwickelte sich die Bar zu einem der zentralen Auftrittsmöglichkeiten für die damalige Jazz-Avantgarde zwischen dem East Village und Greenwich Village. Der Ort von Slug’s Saloon galt in der afroamerikanischen Kultur als geheiligter Ort, beschrieben in The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man (1912) von James Weldon Johnson. (de)
  • Slugs' Saloon was a jazz club at 242 East 3rd Street, between Avenue B and C in Manhattan's East Village, operating from the mid-1960s to 1972. The location, in what was then a run-down part of New York City, first hosted a Ukrainian restaurant and bar, and later a bar that served as a meeting point for drug dealers. In 1964, Jerry Schultz opened it as a club and initially called it "Slugs' Saloon", the "slugs" being a reference to the "three-centered beings" and "terrestrial three-brained beings" mentioned in the book Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson by George Gurdjieff. Due to New York City regulations, the word "saloon" had to be dropped from the name. The venue was called "Slugs' in the Far East", due to its easterly location in the East Village. The interior of the club was longer th (en)
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  • Slug’s Saloon (de)
  • Slugs' Saloon (en)
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