About: Mustafa Gaibi

An Entity of Type: animal, from Named Graph: http://dbpedia.org, within Data Space: dbpedia.org

Sheikh Mustafa Gaibi or Gaibija was a 17th-century dervish from Ottoman Bosnia whose mausoleum (turbe) at Stara Gradiška in Slavonia, in present-day Croatia, became a prominent site of ritual visitation by Muslims. He was regarded as a prophet by some Catholics. He wrote in Ottoman Turkish a discourse on the rules of the Jelveti Sufi order, to which he belonged. He also wrote letters in which he criticized various kinds of wrongdoing that he regarded as widespread in the Ottoman Empire. His letters contain mystical-looking expressions that are difficult to understand. He is reputed to have predicted the defeat of Ottomans at the Battle of Vienna in 1683 and the subsequent loss of their territories north of the river Sava. According to a local Catholic source, an Ottoman soldier killed Gaib

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Sheikh Mustafa Gaibi or Gaibija was a 17th-century dervish from Ottoman Bosnia whose mausoleum (turbe) at Stara Gradiška in Slavonia, in present-day Croatia, became a prominent site of ritual visitation by Muslims. He was regarded as a prophet by some Catholics. He wrote in Ottoman Turkish a discourse on the rules of the Jelveti Sufi order, to which he belonged. He also wrote letters in which he criticized various kinds of wrongdoing that he regarded as widespread in the Ottoman Empire. His letters contain mystical-looking expressions that are difficult to understand. He is reputed to have predicted the defeat of Ottomans at the Battle of Vienna in 1683 and the subsequent loss of their territories north of the river Sava. According to a local Catholic source, an Ottoman soldier killed Gaibi in Stara Gradiška, at the left bank of the Sava, after he refused to escape with other Muslims across the river before the advancing Habsburg army; they captured Stara Gradiška in 1688. In 1954, his turbe was transferred across the Sava, to the town of Gradiška in Bosnia and Herzegovina. (en)
dbo:birthPlace
dbo:nationality
dbo:religion
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 60081498 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 21104 (xsd:nonNegativeInteger)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 1017858736 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageWikiLink
dbp:annotColor
  • red (en)
dbp:annotTextAlign
  • center (en)
dbp:birthPlace
dbp:caption
  • Former turbe of Sheikh Gaibi at Stara Gradiška, photo from 1934 (en)
  • Plan of the Stara Gradiška fortress from 1750 (en)
dbp:flourished
  • 2 (xsd:integer)
dbp:honorificPrefix
dbp:imageWidth
  • 220 (xsd:integer)
dbp:name
  • Mustafa Gaibi (en)
dbp:nationality
dbp:nativeNameLang
  • Ottoman Turkish (en)
dbp:order
dbp:otherName
  • Gaibija (en)
dbp:philosophy
dbp:religion
dbp:restingPlace
dbp:width
  • 220 (xsd:integer)
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dbp:works
  • Risāle-i tarīkatnāme (en)
dct:subject
georss:point
  • 45.144 17.2468
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Sheikh Mustafa Gaibi or Gaibija was a 17th-century dervish from Ottoman Bosnia whose mausoleum (turbe) at Stara Gradiška in Slavonia, in present-day Croatia, became a prominent site of ritual visitation by Muslims. He was regarded as a prophet by some Catholics. He wrote in Ottoman Turkish a discourse on the rules of the Jelveti Sufi order, to which he belonged. He also wrote letters in which he criticized various kinds of wrongdoing that he regarded as widespread in the Ottoman Empire. His letters contain mystical-looking expressions that are difficult to understand. He is reputed to have predicted the defeat of Ottomans at the Battle of Vienna in 1683 and the subsequent loss of their territories north of the river Sava. According to a local Catholic source, an Ottoman soldier killed Gaib (en)
rdfs:label
  • Mustafa Gaibi (en)
owl:sameAs
geo:geometry
  • POINT(17.246799468994 45.14400100708)
geo:lat
  • 45.144001 (xsd:float)
geo:long
  • 17.246799 (xsd:float)
prov:wasDerivedFrom
foaf:depiction
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Mustafa Gaibi (en)
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is dbo:wikiPageWikiLink of
is foaf:primaryTopic of
Powered by OpenLink Virtuoso    This material is Open Knowledge     W3C Semantic Web Technology     This material is Open Knowledge    Valid XHTML + RDFa
This content was extracted from Wikipedia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License