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In science, the concept of a macroscope is the antithesis of the microscope, namely a method, technique or system by which a very large object can be observed, for example the Earth and its contents, or conceptually, the Universe. Obviously, a single system or instrument does not presently exist that could fulfil this function, however its concept may be approached by some current or future combination of existing observational systems. The term "macroscope" has also been applied to a method or compendium which can view some more specific aspect of global scientific phenomena in its entirety, such as all plant life, or all life on earth. The term has also been used in the humanities, as a generic label for tools which permit an overview of various other forms of "big data". As discussed he

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  • In science, the concept of a macroscope is the antithesis of the microscope, namely a method, technique or system by which a very large object can be observed, for example the Earth and its contents, or conceptually, the Universe. Obviously, a single system or instrument does not presently exist that could fulfil this function, however its concept may be approached by some current or future combination of existing observational systems. The term "macroscope" has also been applied to a method or compendium which can view some more specific aspect of global scientific phenomena in its entirety, such as all plant life, or all life on earth. The term has also been used in the humanities, as a generic label for tools which permit an overview of various other forms of "big data". As discussed here, the concept of a "macroscope" differs in essence from that of the macroscopic scale, which simply takes over from where the microscopic scale leaves off, covering all objects large enough to be visible to the unaided eye, as well as from macro photography, which is the imaging of specimens at magnifications greater than their original size, and for which a specialised microscope-related instrument known as a "Macroscope" has previously been marketed (for more detail, refer text). (en)
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  • In science, the concept of a macroscope is the antithesis of the microscope, namely a method, technique or system by which a very large object can be observed, for example the Earth and its contents, or conceptually, the Universe. Obviously, a single system or instrument does not presently exist that could fulfil this function, however its concept may be approached by some current or future combination of existing observational systems. The term "macroscope" has also been applied to a method or compendium which can view some more specific aspect of global scientific phenomena in its entirety, such as all plant life, or all life on earth. The term has also been used in the humanities, as a generic label for tools which permit an overview of various other forms of "big data". As discussed he (en)
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  • Macroscope (science concept) (en)
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