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South Somerset is a local government district in Somerset, England. The South Somerset district covers an area of 370 square miles (958 km2) ranging from the borders with Devon and Dorset to the edge of the Somerset Levels. It has a population of approximately 162,000. The administrative centre of the district is Yeovil.

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dbo:abstract
  • South Somerset is a local government district in Somerset, England. The South Somerset district covers an area of 370 square miles (958 km2) ranging from the borders with Devon and Dorset to the edge of the Somerset Levels. It has a population of approximately 162,000. The administrative centre of the district is Yeovil. A scheduled monument is a nationally important archaeological site or monument which is given legal protection by being placed on a list (or "schedule") by the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport; Historic England takes the leading role in identifying such sites. The legislation governing this is the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979. The term "monument" can apply to the whole range of archaeological sites, and they are not always visible above ground. Such sites have to have been deliberately constructed by human activity. They range from prehistoric standing stones and burial sites, through Roman remains and medieval structures such as castles and monasteries, to later structures such as industrial sites and buildings constructed for the World Wars or the Cold War. There are 69 scheduled monuments in South Somerset. Some of the oldest are Neolithic, Bronze Age or Iron Age including hillforts, such as Kenwalch's Castle and Bowl barrows. The Romano-British period is represented with several sites including the Low Ham Roman Villa which included an extensive mosaic floor, now on display in the Museum of Somerset. Religious sites are represented by Muchelney Abbey, which was probably founded in the 8th century, and Montacute Priory, a Cluniac priory of the Benedictine order, from the 11th. Bruton Abbey was founded by the Benedictines before becoming a house of Augustinian canons. Stoke sub Hamdon Priory was formed in 1304 as a chantry college rather than a priory. More recent sites include several motte-and-bailey castles such as Cary Castle, and church crosses which date from the Middle Ages. Several packhorse bridges, such as Bow Bridge, Plox also appear in the list. The most recent monuments include the Round House, a village lock-up in Castle Cary dating from 1779, and several duck decoys The monuments are listed below using the titles given in the English Heritage data sheets. (en)
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  • Bruton Abbey (en)
  • Bruton Dovecote (en)
  • Cary Castle (en)
  • Muchelney Abbey (en)
  • Bow Bridge, Bruton (en)
  • Hanging Chapel (en)
  • Low Ham, Roman Villa (en)
  • The Priory, Stoke-sub-Hamdon (en)
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  • A pair of bowl barrows on the Blackdown Hills. The northernmost barrow of the pair was excavated in 1876 which revealed a pottery urn of ashes and other human remains along with a bronze dagger blade. (en)
  • The villa appears to have been constructed around AD 340. Aerial photography has shown that there are a number of farm buildings around a large courtyard, although the excavations concentrated on the residential west wing and bath house. The large 14 foot square mosaic depicts the story of Aeneas and Dido, as told in the 1st century BC by the Roman poet, Virgil. Like the villa, it dates to the mid-4th century. The Low Ham mosaic is unique in Roman Britain in providing a narrative story in five panels: Aeneas sailing to Carthage, Aeneas meeting Dido, the couple out hunting, the couple embrace and Dido left alone after Aeneas' departure. It is the earliest piece of narrative art in the country. It was lifted in 1953 and is now on display in the Museum of Somerset. The site has been placed on the Heritage at Risk Register due to the risks from extensive animal burrowing. (en)
  • The cross has a rectangular base supporting an octagonal shaft from which the head is missing. (en)
  • Earthworks show the site of houses, possibly including a manor house, tracks and a fish pond. The settlement existed before the Norman conquest and was abandoned by the late 18th century. (en)
  • The base of the cross has two steps. The shaft has two carved figures. (en)
  • The remains of a duck decoy close to the River Cary. It is now a small pond with an island. (en)
  • Montacute Priory was a Cluniac priory of the Benedictine order founded between 1078 and 1102 by William, Count of Mortain. All that remains is the Abbey Farmhouse which incorporates the gateway of Montacute Priory, although the sites of an associated fishpond and dovecote have been excavated. (en)
  • Montacute Castle was built after the Norman conquest of England in 1066 by Robert of Mortain. An 18th-century folly, St. Michael's Hill Tower, named after the castle chapel, stands on the site today, making use of part of the castle chapel's foundations. The site is owned by the National Trust and is open to the public. (en)
  • Lindinis was a small town in the Roman province of Britannia. A timber walled fort was established there around AD 60 and later a second fort seems to have been built. Originally surrounded by native round houses, these were later supplanted by a vicus or unplanned civil area of around . (en)
  • Crop marks may represent the site of a Roman building. (en)
  • A 15th-century stone bridge over the River Brue. The bridge, which is long, has two arches. (en)
  • Stoke sub Hamdon Priory is a complex of buildings and ruins initially built in the 14th century for priests serving the chantry chapel of St Nicholas. During the 14th and early 15th centuries, the college fell into disrepair and was rebuilt around 1460. The only building remaining from the religious use is a great hall and attached dwelling, dating from the late 15th century. During the dissolution, the land passed into the laity, and was a tenanted farm until the middle of the 20th century. (en)
  • Earthworks of a platform with the remains of buildings. The site with its surrounding moat is believed to be the medieval mansion home of Matthew de Esse. (en)
  • Dispersed remains of the early market town including post holes of buildings near Church Street. (en)
  • Bruton Abbey was founded as a house of Augustinian canons in 1135, by William de Mohun, who later became the Earl of Somerset. It may have been a Benedictine priory before the Norman conquest of England. After the Dissolution of the Monasteries the abbey was granted to a John Drew of Bristol, but later transferred to Sir Maurice Berkeley. The latter built a house on the site incorporating some of the buildings, but this was demolished in 1786. (en)
  • Muchelney Abbey is an English Heritage property. The site consists of ruined walls showing the layout of the abbey buildings constructed from the 8th to 16th and the remaining intact Abbott's House. It is next to the parish church in which some of the fabric of the abbey has been reused. It comprises the remains and foundations of a medieval Benedictine abbey, the site of an earlier Anglo-Saxon abbey, and an early Tudor house dating from the 16th century, formerly the lodgings of the resident Abbot, which is now a Grade I listed building. (en)
  • is a high cross with a tapering octagonal shaft on stepped octagonal base. (en)
  • Market crosses have stood in the square at Somerton since before 1390; the present Butter Cross, an octagonal roofed market cross, was rebuilt in 1673. It has a slate roof supported by eight arches. (en)
  • Earthworks show the site of houses and water management features. The site is mentioned in documents from the 14th century. (en)
  • Ballands Castle was a motte-and-bailey castle, probably built after the Norman conquest of England in 1066. The castle sits close to the contemporary Norman castles of Cockroad Wood and Castle Orchard, and may have been built as part of a system of fortifications to control the surrounding area.The motte of the castle is now around high, and up to wide. The bailey lies to the south, and both the motte and the bailey are surrounded by ditches. (en)
  • Marks have been identified within a large arable field which may represent the foundations of a Roman villa. (en)
  • A bank and ditch system surrounding the site of an Iron Age hillfort on Barrow Hill. (en)
  • A bell barrow approximately in diameter and high. It was used as the site for a beacon in the 18th century. (en)
  • Earthworks show the site of houses, tracks and ponds. (en)
  • Earthworks including houses and ponds from a settlement occupied in the 13th and 14th centuries. It is surrounded by a medieval field system. (en)
  • The remains of an earth rampart and ditch system. (en)
  • Cockroad Wood Castle was a motte-and-bailey castle, probably built after the Norman conquest of England in 1066. The castle sits close to the contemporary Norman castles of Ballands and Castle Orchard, and may have been built a system of fortifications to control the surrounding area. By 1086 the surrounding land was held by Walter of Douai, although no documentary evidence of the castle remains The castle was built with a motte and two baileys, running along a north-south ridge, with a possible entrance to the east. The motte today is wide, up to high and is surrounded by a deep ditch. The two baileys were probably linked to the motte by wooden bridges. (en)
  • A bowl barrow mound which is in diameter and high. (en)
  • The earthworks of a univallate hillfort. The site is , surrounded by a bank and outer ditch. (en)
  • A series of bowl shaped pits which were used as stone quarries during the Iron Age, Romano-British and Middle Ages. (en)
  • Dundon Hill Hillfort is an Iron Age hillfort. South east of the site is a Bronze Age bowl barrow which, it has been suggested, was later modified as a Norman Motte, known as Dundon Beacon. The site is guarded by a single bank ranging from high, however parts of the site have been damaged by quarrying. Flint flakes, Bronze Age pottery, and Iron Age pottery have also been found, which are now in the Museum of Somerset. (en)
  • Earthworks of a platform with the remains of buildings. The site with its surrounding moat is believed to be the medieval mansion home of the De Pipplepens. (en)
  • The site of a Roman settlement occupied in the 2nd to 4th centuries. Stone foundations of at least three buildings have been identified. (en)
  • The tithe barn of Muchelney Abbey was used to store produce from the farms belonging to the abbey. (en)
  • A 14th-century stone bridge carrying a minor road over the River Parrett. The bridge is wide and has two pointed arches. (en)
  • Bruton Dovecote was built in the 16th century. It was at one time used as a house, possibly as a watchtower and as a dovecote. The building was once within the deerpark of Bruton Abbey and was adapted by the monks from a gabled Tudor tower. The conversion to be a dovecote took place around 1780. The square tower was built of local stone with Doulting stone dressings. Although it is now a roofless ruin and some of the windows have been blocked up, it previously had a chimney and the fireplace can still be seen. (en)
  • A medieval hamstone cross with an octagonal shaft on a stepped circular base. (en)
  • Kenwalch's Castle is probably an Iron Age hillfort that may have been converted into a Roman fortress. It covers an area of . There is a single rampart and ditch which are well preserved in places. The road north from Penselwood village crosses the hillfort and probably passes through the original entrances. (en)
  • The site of a Roman villa excavated after the discovery of mosaics including one depicting people dressed in Roman dress and a hunting scene. (en)
  • Earthworks show the site of houses, tracks and farming. (en)
  • Earthworks show the site of a village, with a village pond, and ridge and furrow agriculture. (en)
  • The remains of a medieval village occupied from the 13th to 17th centuries. Masonry foundations of rectangular buildings have been identified. (en)
  • Wimble Toot is a circular earthwork, across and high, with a ditch on the north-west and south-east sides, on the top of a ridge, overlooking a brook which runs into the River Cary and the old Roman road of the Fosse Way. Generally the site is classified as a Bronze Age barrow, used for the burial of the dead, or a windmill mound. An alternative interpretation is that the site was a motte, built after the Norman conquest of England. (en)
  • In 1861 the site was uncovered and tesserae, tiles, slates and painted wall plaster were uncovered from a villa which may have burnt down. (en)
  • A 17th-century stone packhorse bridge over the River Yeo, which replaced an earlier 13th-century bridge at the same site. (en)
  • The site of a Roman villa with hypocaust tiles. Various artefacts have been uncovered at the site. (en)
  • Horse Pool Camp is a univallate Iron Age hillfort enclosure also known as Whitestaunton Camp. The hillfort is an oval shape that is long and wide. (en)
  • The octagonal base of the cross has three steps. The shaft of the cross is topped by a stone ball finial which are more recent than the base. (en)
  • The remains of a six-pipe duck decoy constructed in 1676 and unused by the late 19th century. (en)
  • Ham Hill Hillfort is an Iron Age hillfort located on Ham Hill. It covers an area of , making it one of the largest hillforts in Britain. The site was also occupied during the mesolithic and neolithic periods and later during Roman and medieval eras. (en)
  • earthworks show the remains of several buildings gathered around a village green. At least one house was still occupied in the 16th century. (en)
  • A small circular stone building, which served as the village lock-up. (en)
  • A Roman villa excavated in the 19th century, with baths, hypocausts and mosaics. Nearby is a mausoleum which included coins from Vespasian and the Nerva–Antonine dynasty. (en)
  • Excavations in the 19th century uncovered the site of a Roman villa in the grounds of Whitestaunton Manor. Further work in 2003 by the Time Team identified a bath house. (en)
  • Earthworks show the site of a moated building, ridge and furrow agriculture and a fishpond. (en)
  • The site of a Roman villa which was excavated in the 19th century. Finds included coins from the 3rd century and wall mosaics. A Bronze Age spearhead from the site is in the Museum of Somerset. (en)
  • A bowl barrow approximately in diameter and high. (en)
  • Earthworks within the grounds of Lytes Cary date from the medieval period. They now consist of low grassy banks. (en)
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  • South Somerset is a local government district in Somerset, England. The South Somerset district covers an area of 370 square miles (958 km2) ranging from the borders with Devon and Dorset to the edge of the Somerset Levels. It has a population of approximately 162,000. The administrative centre of the district is Yeovil. (en)
rdfs:label
  • List of scheduled monuments in South Somerset (en)
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