Profanity in the Korean language is referred to as 욕/辱 (yok, insults or swearing). Several of these words have linguistic and historical significance. Various words have different origins. The Korean term for dog, 'gae', for example, can be used in everyday speech with no offensive connotation. When applied to a person, however, 'gae' and its variants (including 개새끼 'Gaesaekki', literally 'son of a dog', and 'son of a bitch' in English) become strong curse words that would not be appropriate for formal or polite conversation.

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  • Profanity in the Korean language is referred to as 욕/辱 (yok, insults or swearing). Several of these words have linguistic and historical significance. Various words have different origins. The Korean term for dog, 'gae', for example, can be used in everyday speech with no offensive connotation. When applied to a person, however, 'gae' and its variants (including 개새끼 'Gaesaekki', literally 'son of a dog', and 'son of a bitch' in English) become strong curse words that would not be appropriate for formal or polite conversation. (en)
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  • Profanity in the Korean language is referred to as 욕/辱 (yok, insults or swearing). Several of these words have linguistic and historical significance. Various words have different origins. The Korean term for dog, 'gae', for example, can be used in everyday speech with no offensive connotation. When applied to a person, however, 'gae' and its variants (including 개새끼 'Gaesaekki', literally 'son of a dog', and 'son of a bitch' in English) become strong curse words that would not be appropriate for formal or polite conversation. (en)
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  • Korean profanity (en)
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