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Kaumudi-Mahotsava (IAST: Kaumudīmahotsava, "Festival of Moonlight") is a Sanskrit play of uncertain date. It is known from a single manuscript discovered in the present-day Kerala state of India. Its style and language suggest that it was composed around the 3rd century. The portion supposedly containing the name of the playwright is damaged, but the name appears to be a feminine one (read by some scholars as "Vijjakaya"), although this cannot be said with certainty. Several scholars have made attempts to identify the play's characters with historical personalities, but most modern scholars believe it to be a work of fiction.

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  • Kaumudi-Mahotsava (IAST: Kaumudīmahotsava, "Festival of Moonlight") is a Sanskrit play of uncertain date. It is known from a single manuscript discovered in the present-day Kerala state of India. Its style and language suggest that it was composed around the 3rd century. The portion supposedly containing the name of the playwright is damaged, but the name appears to be a feminine one (read by some scholars as "Vijjakaya"), although this cannot be said with certainty. Several scholars have made attempts to identify the play's characters with historical personalities, but most modern scholars believe it to be a work of fiction. The play narrates the story of prince Kalyanavarman of Magadha, whose adopted brother Chandasena forms an alliance with the rival Lichchhavis, and treacherously attacks Magadha. Kalyanavarman's father Sundaravarman dies in the attack, and his mother Madiravati commits suicide by self-immolation. The orphaned young prince is taken to safety by his nurse Vinayandhara and other loyalists, and spends several years in exile in the Vindhya forest. When he grows up, his loyal minister Mantragupta instigates the Shabhara and the Pulinda tribes to rebel against Chandasena, and while Chandasena is busy curbing the revolt, stages a coup in the capital Pataliputra. Chandasena is killed, and Kalyanavarman becomes the new king. He marries the Shurasena princess Kirtimati, whom he had met during his exile. (en)
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  • Kaumudi-Mahotsava (IAST: Kaumudīmahotsava, "Festival of Moonlight") is a Sanskrit play of uncertain date. It is known from a single manuscript discovered in the present-day Kerala state of India. Its style and language suggest that it was composed around the 3rd century. The portion supposedly containing the name of the playwright is damaged, but the name appears to be a feminine one (read by some scholars as "Vijjakaya"), although this cannot be said with certainty. Several scholars have made attempts to identify the play's characters with historical personalities, but most modern scholars believe it to be a work of fiction. (en)
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  • Kaumudi-Mahotsava (en)
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