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Gerlac Peterssen (known as Gerlacus Petri) (1377 or 1378 in Deventer – 18 November 1411) was a Dutch mystic. He entered the Institution of the Brethren of Common Life, and devoted his time to calligraphy, transcription of manuscripts, education, and prayer. He became connected with many illustrious contemplative men, e.g., John of Ruysbroeck, Florence Radewyns, Henry of Kalkar, Gerard of Zutphen, Thomas à Kempis, and Johann Vos of Huesden.

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  • Gerlac Peterssen (known as Gerlacus Petri) (1377 or 1378 in Deventer – 18 November 1411) was a Dutch mystic. He entered the Institution of the Brethren of Common Life, and devoted his time to calligraphy, transcription of manuscripts, education, and prayer. He became connected with many illustrious contemplative men, e.g., John of Ruysbroeck, Florence Radewyns, Henry of Kalkar, Gerard of Zutphen, Thomas à Kempis, and Johann Vos of Huesden. When Radewyns founded a monastery of regular canons at Windesheim, in 1386, Gerlac followed him, and remained there till 1403 as a simple clerk; he had no other employment than that of a sexton. He has been called another Kempis, and several critics have ascribed to Kempis words or theories which belong to Gerlac. Gerlac left his brethren to come back to his cell, where, as he said, "somebody was waiting for him". It has been maintained that The Imitation of Christ by Thomas à Kempis reproduced several ideas and the general spirit of Gerlac's ascetic works. In fact, Kempis inserted into the work, which he wrote in 1441, the passage of the Soliloquies where Gerlac says that he would feel no pain, if necessary for the greater glory of God, to be in hell for ever. This passage is an interpolation, which was soon deleted from the Imitation. The difference between the ascetic theories of Gerlac and those of the author of the Imitation are numerous and deep enough to make any similarities apparent. (en)
  • Gerlach Petersen est un écrivain ascétique, né en 1378 à Deventer (Hollande) et mort en 1411. (fr)
  • Gerlach Peters (Deventer, 1378 – Windesheim, 1411) è stato un mistico tedesco. Agostiniano, scrisse un Breviloquim e un Soliloquim ignitum che si inseriscono nel campo della devotio moderna. (it)
  • Gerlach Peters (Deventer, 1370 of 1378 – Windesheim, 1411) was een mysticus en een van de markantste figuren van de Moderne Devotie. (nl)
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  • Gerlach Petersen est un écrivain ascétique, né en 1378 à Deventer (Hollande) et mort en 1411. (fr)
  • Gerlach Peters (Deventer, 1378 – Windesheim, 1411) è stato un mistico tedesco. Agostiniano, scrisse un Breviloquim e un Soliloquim ignitum che si inseriscono nel campo della devotio moderna. (it)
  • Gerlach Peters (Deventer, 1370 of 1378 – Windesheim, 1411) was een mysticus en een van de markantste figuren van de Moderne Devotie. (nl)
  • Gerlac Peterssen (known as Gerlacus Petri) (1377 or 1378 in Deventer – 18 November 1411) was a Dutch mystic. He entered the Institution of the Brethren of Common Life, and devoted his time to calligraphy, transcription of manuscripts, education, and prayer. He became connected with many illustrious contemplative men, e.g., John of Ruysbroeck, Florence Radewyns, Henry of Kalkar, Gerard of Zutphen, Thomas à Kempis, and Johann Vos of Huesden. (en)
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  • Gerlac Peterson (en)
  • Gerlach Petersen (fr)
  • Gerlach Peters (it)
  • Gerlach Peters (nl)
  • Gerlacus Petri (sv)
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