About: Dinnie Stones

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The Dinnie Stones (also called Stanes or Steens) are a pair of Scottish lifting stones located in Potarch, Aberdeenshire. They were made famous by strongman Donald Dinnie, who reportedly carried the stones barehanded across the width of the Potarch Bridge, a distance of 205+1⁄2 in (17 ft 1+1⁄2 in; 5.22 m), in 1860. They remain in use as lifting stones. The stones were reportedly selected in the 1830s as counterweights for use in maintaining the Potarch Bridge. They were lost following World War I, but were rediscovered in 1953 by David P. Webster.

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  • The Dinnie Stones (also called Stanes or Steens) are a pair of Scottish lifting stones located in Potarch, Aberdeenshire. They were made famous by strongman Donald Dinnie, who reportedly carried the stones barehanded across the width of the Potarch Bridge, a distance of 205+1⁄2 in (17 ft 1+1⁄2 in; 5.22 m), in 1860. They remain in use as lifting stones. The stones are composed of granite, with iron rings affixed. They have a combined weight of 332.49 kg (733 lb 0 oz; 52+1⁄2 st), with the larger stone weighing 188.02 kg (414 lb 8 oz; 29+1⁄2 st) and the smaller stone weighing 144.47 kg (318 lb 8 oz; 23 st). The stones were reportedly selected in the 1830s as counterweights for use in maintaining the Potarch Bridge. They were lost following World War I, but were rediscovered in 1953 by David P. Webster. Replicas of the Dinnie Stones have been used in international competition. (en)
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  • The Dinnie Stones (also called Stanes or Steens) are a pair of Scottish lifting stones located in Potarch, Aberdeenshire. They were made famous by strongman Donald Dinnie, who reportedly carried the stones barehanded across the width of the Potarch Bridge, a distance of 205+1⁄2 in (17 ft 1+1⁄2 in; 5.22 m), in 1860. They remain in use as lifting stones. The stones were reportedly selected in the 1830s as counterweights for use in maintaining the Potarch Bridge. They were lost following World War I, but were rediscovered in 1953 by David P. Webster. (en)
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  • Dinnie Stones (en)
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