About: Crowdy-crawn

An Entity of Type: Artifact100021939, from Named Graph: http://dbpedia.org, within Data Space: dbpedia.org

A crowdy-crawn is a wooden hoop covered with sheepskin used as a percussion instrument in western Cornwall at least as early as 1880. It is similar to the Irish bodhrán. It is used by some modern Cornish traditional music groups as a solo or accompaniment instrument. The name crowdy-crawn is derived from the Cornish "croder croghen," literally "skin sieve," sometimes shortened to "crowd." Crowdy Crawn (Sentinel, SENS 1016, 1973) is one of Brenda Wootton's albums, made in collaboration with Richard Gendall.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • A crowdy-crawn is a wooden hoop covered with sheepskin used as a percussion instrument in western Cornwall at least as early as 1880. It is similar to the Irish bodhrán. It is used by some modern Cornish traditional music groups as a solo or accompaniment instrument. The name crowdy-crawn is derived from the Cornish "croder croghen," literally "skin sieve," sometimes shortened to "crowd." The crowdy-crawn is said to have originated from a tool used for gathering or measuring grain. According to one authoritative observer, the Irish bodhrán was derived from the "riddle," an agricultural tool used for sifting coarse material from harvested grain: "most [bodhráns] were made out of sieves and riddles, you know, for riddling corn, they just removed the wire, and used the frame." As a "Riddle drum," the instrument is also known from Dorset and Wiltshire in England. A book on English agricultural hand tools depicts a riddle with a beech frame 28 inches in diameter from Leicestershire, England, and Scotsman Osgood Mackenzie stated that he "never saw a wire riddle for riddling corn or meal in the old days; they were all made of stretched sheep-skins with holes perforated in them by a big red-hot needle", suggesting a cosmopolitan origin for the musical instrument. When not in use in the field, the crowdy-crawn was used to store odds and ends in homes: "In old country house-keeping in West Cornwall, odd things, all worth saving, but for which no special place on the wall, shelf, chimney board, or dresser was provided, were tidied away into the "crowdy-crawn"; a sieve-rind with a bottom of stretched sheep-skin, serving on occasion also as a tambourine for dancers, but originally meant as a corn-measure." The term is also used modernly to describe a gathering of people for Cornish cultural storytelling, lace-making, quilting, spinning and other traditional activities. Crowdy Crawn (Sentinel, SENS 1016, 1973) is one of Brenda Wootton's albums, made in collaboration with Richard Gendall. (en)
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 33051606 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageLength
  • 6906 (xsd:nonNegativeInteger)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 960982785 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageWikiLink
dbp:background
  • percussion (en)
dbp:classification
dbp:hornbostelSachs
  • 211.311000 (xsd:double)
dbp:hornbostelSachsDesc
dbp:name
  • Crowdy-crawn (en)
dbp:related
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
dct:subject
gold:hypernym
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • A crowdy-crawn is a wooden hoop covered with sheepskin used as a percussion instrument in western Cornwall at least as early as 1880. It is similar to the Irish bodhrán. It is used by some modern Cornish traditional music groups as a solo or accompaniment instrument. The name crowdy-crawn is derived from the Cornish "croder croghen," literally "skin sieve," sometimes shortened to "crowd." Crowdy Crawn (Sentinel, SENS 1016, 1973) is one of Brenda Wootton's albums, made in collaboration with Richard Gendall. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Crowdy-crawn (en)
owl:sameAs
prov:wasDerivedFrom
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is dbo:wikiPageWikiLink of
is dbp:instrumentation of
is foaf:primaryTopic of
Powered by OpenLink Virtuoso    This material is Open Knowledge     W3C Semantic Web Technology     This material is Open Knowledge    Valid XHTML + RDFa
This content was extracted from Wikipedia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License