About: Scot and lot     Goto   Sponge   NotDistinct   Permalink

An Entity of Type : owl:Thing, within Data Space : dbpedia.org associated with source document(s)
QRcode icon
http://dbpedia.org/describe/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdbpedia.org%2Fresource%2FScot_and_lot

Scot and lot is a phrase common in the records of English medieval boroughs, referring to local rights and obligations. The term scot comes from the Old English word sceat, meaning a sceat, an ordinary coin in Anglo-Saxon times, equivalent to the later penny. In Anglo-Saxon times, a payment was levied locally to cover the cost of establishing drainage, and embankments, of low-lying land, and observing them to ensure they remain secure. This payment was typically a sceat, so the levy itself gradually became to be called sceat. In burghs, sceat was levied to cover maintenance of the town walls and defences.

AttributesValues
rdfs:label
  • Scot and lot
  • Scot and lot
rdfs:comment
  • Scot and lot is a phrase common in the records of English medieval boroughs, referring to local rights and obligations. The term scot comes from the Old English word sceat, meaning a sceat, an ordinary coin in Anglo-Saxon times, equivalent to the later penny. In Anglo-Saxon times, a payment was levied locally to cover the cost of establishing drainage, and embankments, of low-lying land, and observing them to ensure they remain secure. This payment was typically a sceat, so the levy itself gradually became to be called sceat. In burghs, sceat was levied to cover maintenance of the town walls and defences.
  • Scot and lot (del francés clásico escot, anglosajón sceot, es un pago; un lote, una porción o impuesto) es una frase común en los documentos ingleses de origen medieval.​ Se solía emplear en aquellos impuestos de carácter urbano (como el tallaje). Se cargaba generalmente a las ligas de gremios.
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
dct:subject
Wikipage page ID
Wikipage revision ID
Link from a Wikipage to another Wikipage
sameAs
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
page
volume
has abstract
  • Scot and lot is a phrase common in the records of English medieval boroughs, referring to local rights and obligations. The term scot comes from the Old English word sceat, meaning a sceat, an ordinary coin in Anglo-Saxon times, equivalent to the later penny. In Anglo-Saxon times, a payment was levied locally to cover the cost of establishing drainage, and embankments, of low-lying land, and observing them to ensure they remain secure. This payment was typically a sceat, so the levy itself gradually became to be called sceat. In burghs, sceat was levied to cover maintenance of the town walls and defences. In Norman times, under the influence of the word escot, in Old French, the vowel changed, and the term became scot. In 19th century Kent and Sussex, low-lying farmland was still being called scot-land. Scot, though, gradually became a general term for local levies; a person who was not liable for the levy, but received its benefits, got off 'scot-free'. Lot means portion/share, hence lottery, and allotment. The phrase scot and lot thus meant the local levies someone paid, and the share they received of local provisions; more generally, it meant rights and obligations, in respect of local government. Parliament had evolved from the king's baronial court, with the commons being populated by representatives of the landholders who were too minor to call in person. Burghs were somewhat outside the feudal system, making their franchise ambiguous. Before the mid 19th century, burghs varied in their choice of franchise. In some burghs, the franchise was set at scot and lot; that is, people were only permitted to vote if they were liable for the local levies. In mediaeval times, this could mean dozens of people, and by the 19th century tens of thousands of people could qualify in a single scot and lot burgh. In Gatten, however, only two people qualified under scot and lot; since burghs received 2 MPs, this meant that each MP for Gatten represented exactly 1 voter. The quirks of the existing system, such as Gatton, was one of the reasons for the 1832 Great Reform Act. A cognate term, skat, exists in the udal law of Orkney and Shetland.
  • Scot and lot (del francés clásico escot, anglosajón sceot, es un pago; un lote, una porción o impuesto) es una frase común en los documentos ingleses de origen medieval.​ Se solía emplear en aquellos impuestos de carácter urbano (como el tallaje). Se cargaba generalmente a las ligas de gremios. Antes de a promulgación de la Reform Act 1832, aquellos que pagaban el scot and bore lot fue denominado como una franquicia. La expresión se emplea en la actualidad siguiendo la denominación primitiva. Los miembros que no pagan este impuesto se denominan scot-free y ofrecen los productos a un precio menor.
wstitle
  • Scot and Lot
prov:wasDerivedFrom
page length (characters) of wiki page
is foaf:primaryTopic of
is Link from a Wikipage to another Wikipage of
Faceted Search & Find service v1.17_git51 as of Sep 16 2020


Alternative Linked Data Documents: PivotViewer | iSPARQL | ODE     Content Formats:       RDF       ODATA       Microdata      About   
This material is Open Knowledge   W3C Semantic Web Technology [RDF Data] Valid XHTML + RDFa
OpenLink Virtuoso version 08.03.3321 as of Jun 2 2021, on Linux (x86_64-generic-linux-glibc25), Single-Server Edition (61 GB total memory)
Data on this page belongs to its respective rights holders.
Virtuoso Faceted Browser Copyright © 2009-2021 OpenLink Software