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Sally Young Kanosh (originally known as Kahpeputz or Sally Indian) was a Bannock woman who was kidnapped from her home and sold by a slave-trader named Batiste to Charles Decker, Brigham Young's brother-in-law. She converted to Mormonism and worked in Brigham Young's house as either an indentured servant, adoptive daughter or plural wife. She married Ute chief Kanosh as a plural wife. There is some evidence that she might have been killed by another wife of Kanosh who was jealous of her. In 1906, Susa Young Gates wrote about Sally, who portrayed Young's relationship with Sally as the ideal relationship between whites and Native Americans, which helped put Sally into the collective memory of second generation Mormons in Utah.

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  • Sally Young Kanosh
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  • Sally Young Kanosh (originally known as Kahpeputz or Sally Indian) was a Bannock woman who was kidnapped from her home and sold by a slave-trader named Batiste to Charles Decker, Brigham Young's brother-in-law. She converted to Mormonism and worked in Brigham Young's house as either an indentured servant, adoptive daughter or plural wife. She married Ute chief Kanosh as a plural wife. There is some evidence that she might have been killed by another wife of Kanosh who was jealous of her. In 1906, Susa Young Gates wrote about Sally, who portrayed Young's relationship with Sally as the ideal relationship between whites and Native Americans, which helped put Sally into the collective memory of second generation Mormons in Utah.
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  • Sally Young Kanosh (originally known as Kahpeputz or Sally Indian) was a Bannock woman who was kidnapped from her home and sold by a slave-trader named Batiste to Charles Decker, Brigham Young's brother-in-law. She converted to Mormonism and worked in Brigham Young's house as either an indentured servant, adoptive daughter or plural wife. She married Ute chief Kanosh as a plural wife. There is some evidence that she might have been killed by another wife of Kanosh who was jealous of her. In 1906, Susa Young Gates wrote about Sally, who portrayed Young's relationship with Sally as the ideal relationship between whites and Native Americans, which helped put Sally into the collective memory of second generation Mormons in Utah.
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