About: Pseudolaw     Goto   Sponge   NotDistinct   Permalink

An Entity of Type : owl:Thing, within Data Space : dbpedia.org associated with source document(s)
QRcode icon
http://dbpedia.org/describe/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdbpedia.org%2Fresource%2FPseudolaw

Pseudolaw consists of statements, beliefs, or practices that are claimed to be based on accepted law or legal doctrine, but which deviate significantly from most conventional understandings of law and jurisprudence, or which originate from non-existent statutes or legal principles the advocate or adherent of incorrectly believes exist. Donald Netolitzky defined it as "a collection of legal-sounding but false rules that purport to be law", a definition that distinguishes pseudolaw from arguments that fail to conform to existing laws such as novel arguments or a ignorance of precedent in case law. The features are distinct and conserved. It is sometimes referred to as "legalistic gibberish". The more extreme examples have been classified as paper terrorism.

AttributesValues
rdfs:label
  • Pseudolaw
rdfs:comment
  • Pseudolaw consists of statements, beliefs, or practices that are claimed to be based on accepted law or legal doctrine, but which deviate significantly from most conventional understandings of law and jurisprudence, or which originate from non-existent statutes or legal principles the advocate or adherent of incorrectly believes exist. Donald Netolitzky defined it as "a collection of legal-sounding but false rules that purport to be law", a definition that distinguishes pseudolaw from arguments that fail to conform to existing laws such as novel arguments or a ignorance of precedent in case law. The features are distinct and conserved. It is sometimes referred to as "legalistic gibberish". The more extreme examples have been classified as paper terrorism.
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
dct:subject
Wikipage page ID
Wikipage revision ID
Link from a Wikipage to another Wikipage
sameAs
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
has abstract
  • Pseudolaw consists of statements, beliefs, or practices that are claimed to be based on accepted law or legal doctrine, but which deviate significantly from most conventional understandings of law and jurisprudence, or which originate from non-existent statutes or legal principles the advocate or adherent of incorrectly believes exist. Donald Netolitzky defined it as "a collection of legal-sounding but false rules that purport to be law", a definition that distinguishes pseudolaw from arguments that fail to conform to existing laws such as novel arguments or a ignorance of precedent in case law. The features are distinct and conserved. It is sometimes referred to as "legalistic gibberish". The more extreme examples have been classified as paper terrorism. Followers of such ideologies can cause problems for courts and government administrators by filing unusual applications that are difficult to process. Courts in Canada refer to such arguments as organized pseudolegal commercial arguments (OPCA), and have called them frivolous and vexatious. There is no recorded instance of such tactics being upheld in a court of law. Pseudolaw belief can mimic mental illness. Common among pseudolegal beliefs is a belief that one is partially or fully sovereign from the country in which they live, and believe that no laws, or only certain laws, apply to them. Groups espousing such pseudolegal beliefs include freemen on the land and the sovereign citizen movement. Some believe that their state itself is illegitimate, such as Reichsbürgerbewegung. Also under the umbrella of pseudolegal arguments are conspiracy theorists who believe there is a secret parallel legal system that one can access through certain means, like using a secret phrase or by placing stamps on the right place on documents. For example, the redemption movement believes that a secret fund is created for everyone at birth by the government, and that a procedure exists to "redeem" or reclaim money from this fund. See tax protester conspiracy arguments for a discussion of these beliefs related to tax law. Many of these revolve around the "legal name fraud" movement, which believes that birth certificates give the state legal ownership of a personal name and refusing to use this name therefore removes oneself from a court's jurisdiction. Various groups advocate that one can avoid this state ownership by distinguishing between capitalized and non-capitalized versions of one's name, or by adding punctuation to one's name. See strawman theory (also known as the capital letters argument) for more information.
prov:wasDerivedFrom
page length (characters) of wiki page
is foaf:primaryTopic of
is Link from a Wikipage to another Wikipage of
is Wikipage redirect of
Faceted Search & Find service v1.17_git51 as of Sep 16 2020


Alternative Linked Data Documents: PivotViewer | iSPARQL | ODE     Content Formats:       RDF       ODATA       Microdata      About   
This material is Open Knowledge   W3C Semantic Web Technology [RDF Data] Valid XHTML + RDFa
OpenLink Virtuoso version 08.03.3319 as of Dec 29 2020, on Linux (x86_64-centos_6-linux-glibc2.12), Single-Server Edition (61 GB total memory)
Data on this page belongs to its respective rights holders.
Virtuoso Faceted Browser Copyright © 2009-2021 OpenLink Software