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The meridian-crossing effect is a phenomenon described and evidenced for in the scientific field of visual neuropsychology. It refers to an increase in reaction time to non-attended stimuli located across the vertical meridian, compared to non-attended stimuli located across the horizontal meridian (Huges & Zimba, 1987), i.e., the movement of attention is slower when it has to cross the vertical meridian as compared to the horizontal meridian. The horizontal meridian in a visual field extends from the left to the right of the observer. The vertical meridian, on the other hand extends from above the line of sight of the observer to below the line of sight of the observer. The vertical meridian can also be seen as a barrier that differentiates the attended stimuli from the non- attended stim

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  • Meridian crossing effect
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  • The meridian-crossing effect is a phenomenon described and evidenced for in the scientific field of visual neuropsychology. It refers to an increase in reaction time to non-attended stimuli located across the vertical meridian, compared to non-attended stimuli located across the horizontal meridian (Huges & Zimba, 1987), i.e., the movement of attention is slower when it has to cross the vertical meridian as compared to the horizontal meridian. The horizontal meridian in a visual field extends from the left to the right of the observer. The vertical meridian, on the other hand extends from above the line of sight of the observer to below the line of sight of the observer. The vertical meridian can also be seen as a barrier that differentiates the attended stimuli from the non- attended stim
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  • The meridian-crossing effect is a phenomenon described and evidenced for in the scientific field of visual neuropsychology. It refers to an increase in reaction time to non-attended stimuli located across the vertical meridian, compared to non-attended stimuli located across the horizontal meridian (Huges & Zimba, 1987), i.e., the movement of attention is slower when it has to cross the vertical meridian as compared to the horizontal meridian. The horizontal meridian in a visual field extends from the left to the right of the observer. The vertical meridian, on the other hand extends from above the line of sight of the observer to below the line of sight of the observer. The vertical meridian can also be seen as a barrier that differentiates the attended stimuli from the non- attended stimuli. Meridian crossing effect can also be called different-hemifield advantage. According to this, performance rates increase when a task is completed across both the left and right visual hemifields than when performed in a within hemifield version of the task (Sereno & Kosslyn, 1991). A hemifield can be defined as a 170° range of vision that is seen by one eye focusing straight ahead. This should not be confused with bilateral distribution advantage. Different-hemifield advantage mainly holds true only for early perceptual processes. It focuses on the competition for attentional resources in spatial attention. Bilateral distribution advantage on the other hand occurs during more complex or demanding tasks. The Meridian crossing effect was first described by H. C. Huges and L. D. Zimba in the year 1987 in their paper, "Natural boundaries for the spatial spread of directed visual attention".
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