About: List of Central American monkey species     Goto   Sponge   NotDistinct   Permalink

An Entity of Type : owl:Thing, within Data Space : dbpedia.org associated with source document(s)
QRcode icon
http://dbpedia.org/describe/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdbpedia.org%2Fresource%2FList_of_Central_American_monkey_species

At least seven monkey species are native to Central America. An eighth species, the Coiba Island howler (Alouatta coibensis) is often recognized, but some authorities treat it as a subspecies of the mantled howler, (A. palliata). A ninth species, the black-headed spider monkey (Ateles fusciceps)is also often recognized, but some authorities regard it as a subspecies of Geoffroy's spider monkey (A. geoffroyi). In addition, two species of white-faced capuchin monkey have been generally recognized since the 2010s although some primatologists consider these to be a single species. Taxonomically, all Central American monkey species are classified as New World monkeys, and they belong to four families. Five species belong to the family Atelidae, which includes the howler monkeys, spider monkeys,

AttributesValues
rdfs:label
  • List of Central American monkey species
  • Lista de primatas da América Central
rdfs:comment
  • At least seven monkey species are native to Central America. An eighth species, the Coiba Island howler (Alouatta coibensis) is often recognized, but some authorities treat it as a subspecies of the mantled howler, (A. palliata). A ninth species, the black-headed spider monkey (Ateles fusciceps)is also often recognized, but some authorities regard it as a subspecies of Geoffroy's spider monkey (A. geoffroyi). In addition, two species of white-faced capuchin monkey have been generally recognized since the 2010s although some primatologists consider these to be a single species. Taxonomically, all Central American monkey species are classified as New World monkeys, and they belong to four families. Five species belong to the family Atelidae, which includes the howler monkeys, spider monkeys,
  • Pelo menos sete espécie de macacos são nativos da América Central. Uma oitava espécie Alouatta coibensis é frequentemente reconhecida, mas alguns autores o consideram como subespécie de Alouatta palliata. Uma nona espécie Ateles fusciceps também é frequentemente reconhecida, mas alguns autores consideram como subespécie de Ateles geoffroyi. Taxonomicamente, todos os primatas centro-americanos são classificados como Macacos do Novo Mundo. Cinco espécies pertencem à família Atelidae, que incluem os bugios, macacos-aranhas, macacos-barrigudos e os muriquis. Duas espécies pertencem à subfamília Cebinae (família Cebidae), que incluem os macacos-pregos e macacos-de-cheiro. Uma espécie pertence à subfamília Callitrichinae, que são os saguis e micos-leões, e uma pertence à família Aotidae, que são
foaf:depiction
  • External Image
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
thumbnail
dct:subject
Wikipage page ID
Wikipage revision ID
Link from a Wikipage to another Wikipage
sameAs
dbp:wikiPageUsesTemplate
has abstract
  • At least seven monkey species are native to Central America. An eighth species, the Coiba Island howler (Alouatta coibensis) is often recognized, but some authorities treat it as a subspecies of the mantled howler, (A. palliata). A ninth species, the black-headed spider monkey (Ateles fusciceps)is also often recognized, but some authorities regard it as a subspecies of Geoffroy's spider monkey (A. geoffroyi). In addition, two species of white-faced capuchin monkey have been generally recognized since the 2010s although some primatologists consider these to be a single species. Taxonomically, all Central American monkey species are classified as New World monkeys, and they belong to four families. Five species belong to the family Atelidae, which includes the howler monkeys, spider monkeys, woolly monkeys and muriquis. Three species belong to the family Cebidae, the family that includes the capuchin monkeys and squirrel monkeys. One species each belongs to the night monkey family, Aotidae, and the tamarin and marmoset family, Callitrichidae. Geoffroy's spider monkey is the only monkey found in all seven Central American countries, and it is also found in Colombia, Ecuador and Mexico. Other species that have a widespread distribution throughout Central America are the mantled howler, which is found in five Central American countries, and the Panamanian white-faced capuchin (Cebus imitator), which is found in four Central American countries. The Coiba Island howler, the black-headed spider monkey, the Panamanian night monkey (Aotus zonalis), the Colombian white-faced capuchin (Cebus capucinus) and Geoffroy's tamarin (Saguinus geoffroyi) are each found in only one Central American country, Panama. The Central American squirrel monkey (Saimiri oerstedii) also has a restricted distribution, living only on part of the Pacific coast of Costa Rica and a small portion of Panama. El Salvador is the Central American country with the fewest monkey species, as only Geoffroy's spider monkey lives there. Panama has the most species, nine, as the only Central American monkey species that does not include Panama within its range is the Guatemalan black howler (Alouatta pigra). Geoffroy's tamarin is the smallest Central American monkey, with an average size of about 0.5 kilograms (1.1 lb). The Central American squirrel monkey and Panamanian night monkey are almost as small, with average sizes of less than 1.0 kilogram (2.2 lb). The Guatemalan black howler has the largest males, which average over 11 kilograms (24 lb). The spider monkey species have the next largest males, which average over 8 kilograms (18 lb). One Central American monkey, the black-headed spider monkey, is considered to be Critically Endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). Geoffroy's spider monkey and the Guatemalan black howler are both considered to be Endangered. The Central American squirrel monkey had been considered endangered, but its conservation status was upgraded to Vulnerable in 2008. The Coiba Island howler is also considered to be vulnerable. The white-faced capuchins, the mantled howler and Geoffroy's tamarin are all considered to be of Least Concern from a conservation standpoint. Monkey watching is a popular tourist activity in parts of Central America. In Costa Rica, popular areas to view monkeys include Corcovado National Park, Manuel Antonio National Park, Santa Rosa National Park Guanacaste National Park and Lomas de Barbudal Biological Reserve. Corcovado National Park is the only park in Costa Rica in which all the country's four monkey species can be seen. The more accessible Manuel Antonio National Park is the only other park in Costa Rica in which the Central American squirrel monkey is found, and the Panamanian white-faced capuchin and mantled howler are also commonly seen there. Within Panama, areas to view monkeys include Darién National Park, Soberanía National Park and a number of islands on Gatun Lake including Barro Colorado Island. In addition, Geoffroy's tamarin can be seen in Metropolitan Natural Park within Panama City. In Belize, the easily explored Community Baboon Sanctuary was established specifically for the preservation of the Guatemalan black howler and now contains more than 1000 monkeys.
  • Pelo menos sete espécie de macacos são nativos da América Central. Uma oitava espécie Alouatta coibensis é frequentemente reconhecida, mas alguns autores o consideram como subespécie de Alouatta palliata. Uma nona espécie Ateles fusciceps também é frequentemente reconhecida, mas alguns autores consideram como subespécie de Ateles geoffroyi. Taxonomicamente, todos os primatas centro-americanos são classificados como Macacos do Novo Mundo. Cinco espécies pertencem à família Atelidae, que incluem os bugios, macacos-aranhas, macacos-barrigudos e os muriquis. Duas espécies pertencem à subfamília Cebinae (família Cebidae), que incluem os macacos-pregos e macacos-de-cheiro. Uma espécie pertence à subfamília Callitrichinae, que são os saguis e micos-leões, e uma pertence à família Aotidae, que são os macacos-da-noite. Ateles geoffroyi é o único macaco encontrado em todos os países centroamericanos, e também ocorre na Colômbia, Equador e México. Outras espécies com ampla distribuição na América Central são Alouatta palliata, encontrado em cinco países, e o macaco-prego-de-cara-branca (Cebus capucinus), encontrado em quatro países. A. coibensis, Ateles fusciceps, Aotus zonalis e Saguinus geoffroyi são encontrados apenas no Panamá. Saimiri oerstedii também possui distribuição restrita, vivendo na costa do Oceano Pacífico na Costa Rica e em uma pequena porção do Panamá. El Salvador é o país com o menor número de espécies, e somente A. geoffroyi é encontrado lá. Panamá é o que possui o maior número, oito espécies, e a única espécie que não ocorre neste país e Alouatta pigra. S. geoffroyi é o menor macaco centroamericano, pesando, em média, 500 g. S. oerstedii e A. zonalis são quase tão pequenos quanto, tendo ambos, cerca de 1 kg. Alouatta pigra possui os mais pesados machos, tendo em média 11 kg. Em segundo lugar de peso, os machos de Ateles geoffroyi são os mais pesados, com cerca de 8 kg. Um macaco centroamericano, Ateles fusciceps, é considerado como "criticamente em perigo" pela IUCN. Ateles geoffroyi e Alouatta pigra são considerados como "em perigo". Saimiri oerstedii já foi considerado como "em perigo", mas atualmente é uma espécie vulnerável, desde 2008. Alouatta coibensis também é considerado "vulnerável". O macaco-prego-de-cara-branca, Alouatta palliata e Saguinus geoffroyi são todos considerados espécies em "baixo risco" de extinção. Observar macacos é uma atividade turística popular em partes da América Central. Na Costa Rica, áreas populares para tal atividade são o Parque Nacional Corcovado, o Parque Nacional Manuel Antonio, o , o e a . O Parque Nacional Corcovado é o único parque em que se observa as quatro espécies de primatas da Costa Rica. O mais acessível Parque Nacional Manuel Antonio é o outro parque na Costa Rica em que se encontra Saimiri oertesdii, e o macaco-prego-de-cara-branca e Alouatta palliata também são comuns lá. Dentro do Panamá, essas áreas incluem o , o e um número de ilhas Lago Gatún incluind a ilha de Barro Colorado. Ademais, Saguinus geoffroyi pode ser observado no , dentro da Cidade do Panamá. Em Belize, o mais facilmente explorado é o que foi criado exatamente para a preservação de Alouatta pigra e agora contém mais de 1000 animais da espécie.
prov:wasDerivedFrom
page length (characters) of wiki page
is foaf:primaryTopic of
is Link from a Wikipage to another Wikipage of
Faceted Search & Find service v1.17_git51 as of Sep 16 2020


Alternative Linked Data Documents: PivotViewer | iSPARQL | ODE     Content Formats:       RDF       ODATA       Microdata      About   
This material is Open Knowledge   W3C Semantic Web Technology [RDF Data] Valid XHTML + RDFa
OpenLink Virtuoso version 08.03.3319 as of Dec 29 2020, on Linux (x86_64-centos_6-linux-glibc2.12), Single-Server Edition (61 GB total memory)
Data on this page belongs to its respective rights holders.
Virtuoso Faceted Browser Copyright © 2009-2021 OpenLink Software