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Death in Islam is the termination of worldly life and the beginning of afterlife. Death is seen as the separation of the soul from the body, and its transfer from this world to the afterlife. Islamic tradition discusses elaborately, as what happens before, during, and after the death, although what exactly happens is not clear and different schools of thought may end up with different conclusions. However, a continuity between all these ideas derived from the basic sources from the Quran and Islamic narratives. One canonical idea is, that the angel of death (Arabic: Malak al-Maut) appears to the dying to take out their souls. The sinners' souls are extracted in the most painful way while the righteous are treated easily.

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  • Islamic view of death
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  • Death in Islam is the termination of worldly life and the beginning of afterlife. Death is seen as the separation of the soul from the body, and its transfer from this world to the afterlife. Islamic tradition discusses elaborately, as what happens before, during, and after the death, although what exactly happens is not clear and different schools of thought may end up with different conclusions. However, a continuity between all these ideas derived from the basic sources from the Quran and Islamic narratives. One canonical idea is, that the angel of death (Arabic: Malak al-Maut) appears to the dying to take out their souls. The sinners' souls are extracted in the most painful way while the righteous are treated easily.
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  • Death in Islam is the termination of worldly life and the beginning of afterlife. Death is seen as the separation of the soul from the body, and its transfer from this world to the afterlife. Islamic tradition discusses elaborately, as what happens before, during, and after the death, although what exactly happens is not clear and different schools of thought may end up with different conclusions. However, a continuity between all these ideas derived from the basic sources from the Quran and Islamic narratives. One canonical idea is, that the angel of death (Arabic: Malak al-Maut) appears to the dying to take out their souls. The sinners' souls are extracted in the most painful way while the righteous are treated easily. Another common idea, although appearing relatively late in Islamic traditions, adds that, after the burial, two angels – Munkar and Nakir – come to question the dead in order to test their faith. The righteous believers answer correctly and live in peace and comfort while the sinners and disbelievers fail and punishments ensue. The time period or stage between death and the end of the world is called the life of barzakh. Suicide, euthanasia, and unjust murder as means of death are all prohibited in Islam, and are considered major sins. Muslims believe life is God's gift, it is not given by man. Believing in an afterlife is one of the six articles of faith in Islam. Yet, the abode of the deceased is up to debate. They may either be in heaven/hell, in an intermediary state, or "sleep" until a great resurrection.
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