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The Glastonbury thorn is a form of common hawthorn, Crataegus monogyna 'Biflora' (sometimes incorrectly called Crataegus oxyacantha var. praecox), found in and around Glastonbury, Somerset, England. Unlike ordinary hawthorn trees, it flowers twice a year (hence the name "biflora"), the first time in winter and the second time in spring. The trees in the Glastonbury area have been propagated by grafting since ancient times. The tree is also widely called the holy thorn, though this term strictly speaking refers to the original (legendary) tree.

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  • Glastonbury Thorn
  • Glastonbury Thorn
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  • Als Glastonbury Thorn wird eine Variante des Weißdorns bezeichnet, die in der Gegend von Glastonbury in Somerset in England vorkommt. Als botanischen Namen findet man Crataegus monogyna ‚Biflora‘, gelegentlich auch Crataegus oxyacantha var. praecox. Die Pflanzen gehören allerdings zur Art Crataegus monogyna, sodass der letztere Name irreführend ist. Im Gegensatz zum normalen Weißdorn blühen diese Bäume zwei Mal im Jahr (daher auch der Namenszusatz biflora), im Winter und im Frühjahr. Soweit bekannt, gibt es nur durch Veredelung vermehrte Exemplare. Zweimal blühende Crataegus monogyna, die dem Holy Thorn morphologisch sehr ähnlich sind, sind als Wildvorkommen aus Nordafrika bekannt.
  • The Glastonbury thorn is a form of common hawthorn, Crataegus monogyna 'Biflora' (sometimes incorrectly called Crataegus oxyacantha var. praecox), found in and around Glastonbury, Somerset, England. Unlike ordinary hawthorn trees, it flowers twice a year (hence the name "biflora"), the first time in winter and the second time in spring. The trees in the Glastonbury area have been propagated by grafting since ancient times. The tree is also widely called the holy thorn, though this term strictly speaking refers to the original (legendary) tree.
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  • Als Glastonbury Thorn wird eine Variante des Weißdorns bezeichnet, die in der Gegend von Glastonbury in Somerset in England vorkommt. Als botanischen Namen findet man Crataegus monogyna ‚Biflora‘, gelegentlich auch Crataegus oxyacantha var. praecox. Die Pflanzen gehören allerdings zur Art Crataegus monogyna, sodass der letztere Name irreführend ist. Im Gegensatz zum normalen Weißdorn blühen diese Bäume zwei Mal im Jahr (daher auch der Namenszusatz biflora), im Winter und im Frühjahr. Soweit bekannt, gibt es nur durch Veredelung vermehrte Exemplare. Zweimal blühende Crataegus monogyna, die dem Holy Thorn morphologisch sehr ähnlich sind, sind als Wildvorkommen aus Nordafrika bekannt.
  • The Glastonbury thorn is a form of common hawthorn, Crataegus monogyna 'Biflora' (sometimes incorrectly called Crataegus oxyacantha var. praecox), found in and around Glastonbury, Somerset, England. Unlike ordinary hawthorn trees, it flowers twice a year (hence the name "biflora"), the first time in winter and the second time in spring. The trees in the Glastonbury area have been propagated by grafting since ancient times. The tree is also widely called the holy thorn, though this term strictly speaking refers to the original (legendary) tree. It is associated with legends about Joseph of Arimathea and the arrival of Christianity in Britain, and has appeared in written texts since the medieval period. A flowering sprig is sent to the British Monarch every Christmas. The original tree has been propagated several times, with one tree growing at Glastonbury Abbey and another in the churchyard of the Church of St John. The "original" Glastonbury thorn was cut down and burned as a relic of superstition during the English Civil War, and one planted on Wearyall Hill in 1951 to replace it had its branches cut off in 2010.
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