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In Forsyth County, Georgia, in September 1912 two separate attacks on white women resulted in black men being accused as suspects. One white woman accused a black man of raping her, and another woman was found to have been fatally beaten and raped. These cases resulted in numerous blacks being arrested, and some being physically assaulted by whites. A black preacher was harshly beaten for having been heard to suggest that the first woman may have had a consensual relationship with a black man. Five blacks were charged in the second crime, and one was lynched by a mob of thousands at the county jail; two youths (aged 16 and 17) in the case were convicted of rape and murder by an all-white jury and sentenced to death by hanging. Thousands of whites attended the hangings. In the early stages

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  • 1912 Racial Conflict of Forsyth County, Georgia
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  • In Forsyth County, Georgia, in September 1912 two separate attacks on white women resulted in black men being accused as suspects. One white woman accused a black man of raping her, and another woman was found to have been fatally beaten and raped. These cases resulted in numerous blacks being arrested, and some being physically assaulted by whites. A black preacher was harshly beaten for having been heard to suggest that the first woman may have had a consensual relationship with a black man. Five blacks were charged in the second crime, and one was lynched by a mob of thousands at the county jail; two youths (aged 16 and 17) in the case were convicted of rape and murder by an all-white jury and sentenced to death by hanging. Thousands of whites attended the hangings. In the early stages
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  • In Forsyth County, Georgia, in September 1912 two separate attacks on white women resulted in black men being accused as suspects. One white woman accused a black man of raping her, and another woman was found to have been fatally beaten and raped. These cases resulted in numerous blacks being arrested, and some being physically assaulted by whites. A black preacher was harshly beaten for having been heard to suggest that the first woman may have had a consensual relationship with a black man. Five blacks were charged in the second crime, and one was lynched by a mob of thousands at the county jail; two youths (aged 16 and 17) in the case were convicted of rape and murder by an all-white jury and sentenced to death by hanging. Thousands of whites attended the hangings. In the early stages of the unrest, the Sheriff received reinforcements of 25 Georgia National Guard troops, but they could not control the mob. The prisoner Ernest Knox was taken to Gainesville and then Atlanta to protect him from the mob before trial. In 1910 more than 1,000 blacks lived in the county, which had more than 10,000 whites. After the trials and executions, bands of white men, known as Night Riders, threatened and intimidated blacks in the county, forcing them out in an early racial expulsion. Most of the blacks lost their land and other property when they fled. Whites took over their abandoned property. Within the next four months, an estimated 98% of the blacks living in the county had left. In the surrounding counties, whites forced an estimated 50% to 100% of blacks from their homes. Most never returned. This has been called the largest case of black expulsion in the history of the United States. As late as the 1980s, no blacks lived in Forsyth County. This racial expulsion or racial cleansing was explored in the documentary Banished: American Ethnic Cleansings, aired on PBS in 2015 in its Independent Lens series.
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