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Tajika Jyotish
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The tājika jyotiṣ, or tājika śastra, that is, the tājika system of astrology, is one of the three systems of Indian astrology as applied to individual charts (horoscopes). The other two systems are the Parāśari and Jaimini systems. The word tājika (perhaps of Urdu origin) means an Arab or a Persian and it indicates the history of the evolution of this system of astrology in India. This system of astrology must have originated in the Arab/Persian world. It was with Arab invasions of North-West India, from the 7th century onwards, or with the Indian mercantile trade with Arabs, Armenians and Persians, that knowledge of tājika astrology came to India. In 1544 CE, an Indian scholar Neelkantha, son of Shrimad Anant Daivajna translated this system from Arabic/Persian to Sanskrit in his text "Taj
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The tājika jyotiṣ, or tājika śastra, that is, the tājika system of astrology, is one of the three systems of Indian astrology as applied to individual charts (horoscopes). The other two systems are the Parāśari and Jaimini systems. The word tājika (perhaps of Urdu origin) means an Arab or a Persian and it indicates the history of the evolution of this system of astrology in India. This system of astrology must have originated in the Arab/Persian world. It was with Arab invasions of North-West India, from the 7th century onwards, or with the Indian mercantile trade with Arabs, Armenians and Persians, that knowledge of tājika astrology came to India. In 1544 CE, an Indian scholar Neelkantha, son of Shrimad Anant Daivajna translated this system from Arabic/Persian to Sanskrit in his text "Tajika Neelakanthi". The tājika system attempts to predict in detail the likely happenings in one year of an individual's life. The system goes to such details as to predict events even on a day-by-day basis or even half-a-day. On account of this, this system is also called the varṣaphala system. The term varshaphala means the consequence, effect, or result for one year of the planetary transits at the moment of the solar return. A year under scrutiny begins at the moment when the sun returns to the same longitude as it had at the time of the individual's birth. This moment is called the moment of solar return. The duration between one moment of solar return till the next moment of solar return is the period covered by one annual chart or the varṣa-kunḍali. Such an annual chart was meant to be constructed for every year and examined in detail. "... the Tajika or the annual horoscopy, has been rather overwhelmingly dominated by the natal horoscopy. Recently, however, the need to resort to annual horoscopy has been increasing in our industrial society where career planning, travel planning, work planning and job planning are done with in a specified time-table of one to, say, five years. In which of the next five years it would be more fruitful to start a venture is a question many people ask. This question is generally answered on the basis of the birth horoscope, the dasha periods and transits.The question is, whether such pinpointed guidance and counselling can be further refined and put in sharp focus astrologically? ... The Tajika takes care of all those areas that are covered by the natal horoscopy. Thus it can reveal about health and disease, marriage, childbirth, income, expenditure, promotions, transfer, travel, rise and fall in career, imprisonment, death, etc. It is true to say that the Tajika cannot give what the birth horoscope does not promise. It is truer to say that the Tajika reveals, with greater clarity, the year in which the promise of the birth horoscope will be fulfilled. The Tajika is thus complimentary, supplementary and confirmatory in nature."
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