Thais per capita generate an estimated 1.1 kg of solid waste per day—50 percent of it biodegradable. Thailand in 2015 generated 26.9 million tonnes of solid waste, about 73,560 tonnes per day. The yearly figure in 2009 was 15.1 million tonnes. Twenty percent of total is generated in the Bangkok Metropolitan Area (BMA) Of the waste generated in 2015, only about five million tonnes were recycled. Only about eight million tonnes were handled in accordance with global best practices. Of Thailand's 2,500 dump sites, only about 20 percent are managed properly. According to the Pollution Control Department (PCD), Thailand's primary waste watchdog, the nation faces serious solid waste management issues. Those issues are increasing. Wichan Simachaya, director-general of the PCD, said the volume of

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  • Thais per capita generate an estimated 1.1 kg of solid waste per day—50 percent of it biodegradable. Thailand in 2015 generated 26.9 million tonnes of solid waste, about 73,560 tonnes per day. The yearly figure in 2009 was 15.1 million tonnes. Twenty percent of total is generated in the Bangkok Metropolitan Area (BMA) Of the waste generated in 2015, only about five million tonnes were recycled. Only about eight million tonnes were handled in accordance with global best practices. Of Thailand's 2,500 dump sites, only about 20 percent are managed properly. According to the Pollution Control Department (PCD), Thailand's primary waste watchdog, the nation faces serious solid waste management issues. Those issues are increasing. Wichan Simachaya, director-general of the PCD, said the volume of waste could continue to grow by 600,000 tonnes a year, due to increasing population and tourism. Thailand's waste management plan calls for 75 percent of Thailand's total solid waste to be properly disposed of or recycled in some way by 2021, up from the current 49 percent. By 2021, the government and private sector plan to spend a total of 177 billion baht (US$5.1 billion) on waste management technology and public awareness campaigns. "We have fines for littering but no one seems to care," Wijarn said. "We need to step up law enforcement as well as teach people to recycle, reuse and reduce waste." In Thailand the roles in solid waste management (MSW) and industrial waste management are organized by the Royal Thai Government, which is then divided among the central government, regional governments, and local governments. Each government is responsible for different tasks. The central government is responsible to stimulate regulation, policies, and standards. The regional governments are responsible for coordinating central and local governments. Local governments are responsible for waste management in their governed area. Local governments themselves do not dispose of waste, but instead hire private companies that have been granted that right by the PCD. A major problem is lack of funding for waste management—the average Thai household pays less than one dollar a month to dispose of their solid waste. The main companies are Bangpoo Industrial Waste Management Center; General Environmental Conservation Public Company Limited (GENCO); SGS Thailand; Waste Management Siam Ltd (WMS); and Better World Green Public Company Limited (BWG). A leading resource recovery company is Wongpanit, who purchase mixed recyclables (paper, plastics, glass, aluminum, steel) at about 11,300 baht per tonne. These companies are responsible for the waste they have picked up from their customers before disposal. (en)
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  • Thais per capita generate an estimated 1.1 kg of solid waste per day—50 percent of it biodegradable. Thailand in 2015 generated 26.9 million tonnes of solid waste, about 73,560 tonnes per day. The yearly figure in 2009 was 15.1 million tonnes. Twenty percent of total is generated in the Bangkok Metropolitan Area (BMA) Of the waste generated in 2015, only about five million tonnes were recycled. Only about eight million tonnes were handled in accordance with global best practices. Of Thailand's 2,500 dump sites, only about 20 percent are managed properly. According to the Pollution Control Department (PCD), Thailand's primary waste watchdog, the nation faces serious solid waste management issues. Those issues are increasing. Wichan Simachaya, director-general of the PCD, said the volume of (en)
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  • Waste management in Thailand (en)
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