The Walther Model 1936 Olympia II is a single action semi-automatic handgun manufactured by Walther. The first version was the M1925, formally known as the Automatic Walther Sport Pistol cal.22 LR, and was introduced in 1925. It was followed by the M1932, the Olympia Pistole I, and used to good effect in the 1932 Olympic Games. The final development Walther made was the M1936 Olympia II that won five Gold Medals at the 1936 Berlin Olympics and effectively ended the Olympic reign of the Colt Woodsman Target model. The pistol continued to be manufactured up until 1944, but no major changes were made during the war. In 1952 the pistol was reintroduced under license by Hämmerli-Walther. In 1957 Smith & Wesson introduced the Model 41, based on the Olympia-Pistole. The Norinco TT Olympia is a Ch

Property Value
dbo:Weapon/height
  • 119.38
dbo:Weapon/length
  • 304.8
dbo:Weapon/weight
  • 0.87885
dbo:Weapon/width
  • 45.72
dbo:abstract
  • The Walther Model 1936 Olympia II is a single action semi-automatic handgun manufactured by Walther. The first version was the M1925, formally known as the Automatic Walther Sport Pistol cal.22 LR, and was introduced in 1925. It was followed by the M1932, the Olympia Pistole I, and used to good effect in the 1932 Olympic Games. The final development Walther made was the M1936 Olympia II that won five Gold Medals at the 1936 Berlin Olympics and effectively ended the Olympic reign of the Colt Woodsman Target model. The pistol continued to be manufactured up until 1944, but no major changes were made during the war. In 1952 the pistol was reintroduced under license by Hämmerli-Walther. In 1957 Smith & Wesson introduced the Model 41, based on the Olympia-Pistole. The Norinco TT Olympia is a Chinese copy of the Walther M1936 Hunter made sometime after 1980. Most variants were chambered for the .22 Long Rifle but the Schnellfeuer version used the .22 short, produced to equip the German team for the Berlin Olympic Games of 1936 for the rapid fire events. The Olympia pistol is a fixed barrel, internal hammer, open-topped slide design and had a large contoured wooden grip which extended well below the bottom of the butt frame causing the necessity of the magazine bottom plate to be fitted with a wooden block extension. Once World War II started, the need for weapons quickly shifted from competition and sport to the military, thus Olympia production slowed. (en)
dbo:height
  • 0.119380 (xsd:double)
dbo:length
  • 0.304800 (xsd:double)
dbo:origin
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:type
dbo:weight
  • 878.850000 (xsd:double)
dbo:width
  • 0.045720 (xsd:double)
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 11368593 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 727159090 (xsd:integer)
dbp:action
  • single-action semi-automatic
dbp:caption
  • Walther M1936 Olympia-Pistole II, Sport Modell
dbp:cartridge
  • 0.220000 (xsd:double)
dbp:designDate
  • 1936 (xsd:integer)
dbp:designer
  • Fritz Walther
dbp:isRanged
  • yes
dbp:manufacturer
dbp:variants
  • Sport , Funfkampf , Jaeger & Schnellfeuer
dbp:wordnet_type
dct:subject
http://purl.org/linguistics/gold/hypernym
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • The Walther Model 1936 Olympia II is a single action semi-automatic handgun manufactured by Walther. The first version was the M1925, formally known as the Automatic Walther Sport Pistol cal.22 LR, and was introduced in 1925. It was followed by the M1932, the Olympia Pistole I, and used to good effect in the 1932 Olympic Games. The final development Walther made was the M1936 Olympia II that won five Gold Medals at the 1936 Berlin Olympics and effectively ended the Olympic reign of the Colt Woodsman Target model. The pistol continued to be manufactured up until 1944, but no major changes were made during the war. In 1952 the pistol was reintroduced under license by Hämmerli-Walther. In 1957 Smith & Wesson introduced the Model 41, based on the Olympia-Pistole. The Norinco TT Olympia is a Ch (en)
rdfs:label
  • Walther Olympia (en)
owl:sameAs
prov:wasDerivedFrom
foaf:depiction
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Walther M1936 Olympia II (en)
is foaf:primaryTopic of