To Althea, from Prison is a romantic poem written by Richard Lovelace in 1642. The poem is one of Lovelace's best-known works, and its final stanza's first line ("Stone walls do not a prison make, Nor iron bars a cage") is often quoted. Lovelace wrote the poem while imprisoned in Gatehouse Prison for petitioning to have the Clergy Act 1640 annulled.Althea's identity is unknown. "She may even have been a product of Lovelace's imagination.

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  • To Althea, from Prison is a romantic poem written by Richard Lovelace in 1642. The poem is one of Lovelace's best-known works, and its final stanza's first line ("Stone walls do not a prison make, Nor iron bars a cage") is often quoted. Lovelace wrote the poem while imprisoned in Gatehouse Prison for petitioning to have the Clergy Act 1640 annulled.Althea's identity is unknown. "She may even have been a product of Lovelace's imagination. However, evidence suggests she was a woman named Lucy Sacheverell."The poem is quoted in the sixth chapter of Charlotte Brontë's novel Villette, and may have inspired the scenario of Emily Brontë's much-admired poem The Prisoner.
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  • To Althea, from Prison is a romantic poem written by Richard Lovelace in 1642. The poem is one of Lovelace's best-known works, and its final stanza's first line ("Stone walls do not a prison make, Nor iron bars a cage") is often quoted. Lovelace wrote the poem while imprisoned in Gatehouse Prison for petitioning to have the Clergy Act 1640 annulled.Althea's identity is unknown. "She may even have been a product of Lovelace's imagination.
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  • To Althea, from Prison
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