Timed Text Markup Language (TTML), previously referred to as Distribution Format Exchange Profile (DFXP), is one of W3C's standards regulating timed text on the internet. “TTML is used in the television industry for the purpose of authoring, transcoding and exchanging timed text information and for delivering captions, subtitles, and other metadata for television material repurposed for the Web or, more generally, the Internet.There is partial and full support of TTML in components used by several Web browsers plugins, and in a number of caption authoring tools.”— Timed Text Markup Language 1 (TTML1) (Second Edition)

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Timed Text Markup Language (TTML), previously referred to as Distribution Format Exchange Profile (DFXP), is one of W3C's standards regulating timed text on the internet. “TTML is used in the television industry for the purpose of authoring, transcoding and exchanging timed text information and for delivering captions, subtitles, and other metadata for television material repurposed for the Web or, more generally, the Internet.There is partial and full support of TTML in components used by several Web browsers plugins, and in a number of caption authoring tools.”— Timed Text Markup Language 1 (TTML1) (Second Edition) In 2010, after discussions about its adoption in HTML5, WHATWG opted for a new but more lightweight standard based on the popular SRT format, now named WebVTT. Nonetheless, in February 2012 the FCC declared the SMPTE closed-captioning standard for online video content, a superset of TTML, as a "safe harbor interchange, delivery format". It is not clear whether the HTML5 specification will document the usage of any other timed text format with the <track> tag. However, as of February 2015, W3C only documents the usage of WebVTT with HTML5 and its specification had 434 entries in its commit history, ranging from March 2013 to January 2015, while the latest TTML specification hadn't been modified since September 2013. Recent versions of Internet Explorer introduced support for TTML files in the <track> element, while other browsers still require Javascript, such as in the W3C Timed Text Working Group's 2009 demo of DFXP features. TTML is still the format of choice for some applications that don't rely on HTML5, such as the popular set-top box Roku. (en)
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 45418747 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 737835109 (xsd:integer)
dbp:developer
dbp:extendedFrom
dbp:extension
  • .ttml, .dfxp, .xml
dbp:free
  • Yes
dbp:genre
dbp:mime
  • application/ttml+xml
dbp:name
  • TTML
dbp:sign
dbp:standard
dbp:text
  • “TTML is used in the television industry for the purpose of authoring, transcoding and exchanging timed text information and for delivering captions, subtitles, and other metadata for television material repurposed for the Web or, more generally, the Internet. There is partial and full support of TTML in components used by several Web browsers plugins, and in a number of caption authoring tools.”
dct:subject
rdfs:comment
  • Timed Text Markup Language (TTML), previously referred to as Distribution Format Exchange Profile (DFXP), is one of W3C's standards regulating timed text on the internet. “TTML is used in the television industry for the purpose of authoring, transcoding and exchanging timed text information and for delivering captions, subtitles, and other metadata for television material repurposed for the Web or, more generally, the Internet.There is partial and full support of TTML in components used by several Web browsers plugins, and in a number of caption authoring tools.”— Timed Text Markup Language 1 (TTML1) (Second Edition) (en)
rdfs:label
  • Timed Text Markup Language (en)
owl:sameAs
prov:wasDerivedFrom
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is foaf:primaryTopic of