Thomas Stevenson Pettit (December 21, 1843 – November 29, 1931) was a newspaper publisher and politician from the U.S. state of Kentucky. Orphaned at age ten, he found work in a printing house in his hometown of Frankfort. In 1864, he moved to Owensboro, Kentucky, and purchased a newspaper called the Monitor. He incurred the wrath of Union Army General Stephen G. Burbridge because he vigorously criticized the Republicans' policies during the Civil War; Burbridge ordered Pettit arrested and relocated behind Confederate lines for the duration of the war.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Thomas Stevenson Pettit (December 21, 1843 – November 29, 1931) was a newspaper publisher and politician from the U.S. state of Kentucky. Orphaned at age ten, he found work in a printing house in his hometown of Frankfort. In 1864, he moved to Owensboro, Kentucky, and purchased a newspaper called the Monitor. He incurred the wrath of Union Army General Stephen G. Burbridge because he vigorously criticized the Republicans' policies during the Civil War; Burbridge ordered Pettit arrested and relocated behind Confederate lines for the duration of the war. Following the war, Pettit returned to Owensboro and revived the Monitor. He became involved in politics, serving as personal secretary to Governor James B. McCreary and Reading Clerk of the United States House of Representatives. In the early 1890s, he began to split from the Democrats' political philosophy and was elected to the Kentucky House of Representatives as an Independent. He was the Populist Party's nominee for governor in the 1895 gubernatorial election. Although he fell well short of election, his presence on the ticket drew enough votes from Democratic candidate Parker Watkins Hardin to give the election to William O. Bradley, who became Kentucky's first Republican governor. Pettit never again sought public office, but amassed a sizable personal fortune through various business investments in and around Owensboro. He died November 29, 1931. The town of Pettit, Kentucky was built on land he helped clear and was named in his honor. (en)
dbo:almaMater
dbo:birthDate
  • 1843-12-21 (xsd:date)
dbo:birthPlace
dbo:birthYear
  • 1843-01-01 (xsd:date)
dbo:deathDate
  • 1931-11-29 (xsd:date)
dbo:deathPlace
dbo:deathYear
  • 1931-01-01 (xsd:date)
dbo:knownFor
dbo:occupation
dbo:party
dbo:religion
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 32605571 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 741244993 (xsd:integer)
dbp:alt
  • A man with dark hair and a mustache wearing a high-collared white shirt and a black jacket
dbp:spouse
  • 1870 (xsd:integer)
  • 1913 (xsd:integer)
  • 1916 (xsd:integer)
  • 1931 (xsd:integer)
  • Alice Frakes
  • Margaret Blair
dct:description
  • American politician (en)
dct:subject
http://purl.org/linguistics/gold/hypernym
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Thomas Stevenson Pettit (December 21, 1843 – November 29, 1931) was a newspaper publisher and politician from the U.S. state of Kentucky. Orphaned at age ten, he found work in a printing house in his hometown of Frankfort. In 1864, he moved to Owensboro, Kentucky, and purchased a newspaper called the Monitor. He incurred the wrath of Union Army General Stephen G. Burbridge because he vigorously criticized the Republicans' policies during the Civil War; Burbridge ordered Pettit arrested and relocated behind Confederate lines for the duration of the war. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Thomas S. Pettit (en)
owl:sameAs
prov:wasDerivedFrom
foaf:depiction
foaf:gender
  • male (en)
foaf:givenName
  • Thomas (en)
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
foaf:name
  • Thomas Pettit (en)
  • Thomas S. Pettit (en)
is foaf:primaryTopic of