"The Limits of Individual Plasticity" is a short essay written by science fiction author H.G. Wells (21 September 1866 – 13 August 1946) in 1895. In it, H.G. Wells speculates his theorieson the plasticity of animals, explaining that the default biological form of an animal may be altered in a way that it would continue to survive even if it, in any way, no longer resembles its inherent form. This could, according to Wells, theoretically be achieved through surgical, or chemical modification. Wells was fully aware that surgical modification is only a physical change, and would not alter an animal's genetic blueprint. He made note that should an animal be surgically modified, their offspring would most likely retain their parent creature's original physical form.

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  • "The Limits of Individual Plasticity" is a short essay written by science fiction author H.G. Wells (21 September 1866 – 13 August 1946) in 1895. In it, H.G. Wells speculates his theorieson the plasticity of animals, explaining that the default biological form of an animal may be altered in a way that it would continue to survive even if it, in any way, no longer resembles its inherent form. This could, according to Wells, theoretically be achieved through surgical, or chemical modification. Wells was fully aware that surgical modification is only a physical change, and would not alter an animal's genetic blueprint. He made note that should an animal be surgically modified, their offspring would most likely retain their parent creature's original physical form. (en)
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  • "The Limits of Individual Plasticity" is a short essay written by science fiction author H.G. Wells (21 September 1866 – 13 August 1946) in 1895. In it, H.G. Wells speculates his theorieson the plasticity of animals, explaining that the default biological form of an animal may be altered in a way that it would continue to survive even if it, in any way, no longer resembles its inherent form. This could, according to Wells, theoretically be achieved through surgical, or chemical modification. Wells was fully aware that surgical modification is only a physical change, and would not alter an animal's genetic blueprint. He made note that should an animal be surgically modified, their offspring would most likely retain their parent creature's original physical form. (en)
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  • The Limits of Individual Plasticity (en)
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