In 1760 King George III agreed with Parliament that he was no longer to govern in person, and therefore was no longer entitled to income from the Crown Estate, which for 700 years had always been used for the administration of the state. Parliament granted a fixed annual income from the Civil List. The resulting system required the annual State expenditure on the Monarchy to be decided by the Treasury and presented to House of Commons. Prior to abolition, the Civil List was fixed at £7.9 million annually for the decade 2001-10, the same amount as in 1991, with the reserve being consumed over the decade. In 2011 the Civil List was raised to £13.7 million.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • In 1760 King George III agreed with Parliament that he was no longer to govern in person, and therefore was no longer entitled to income from the Crown Estate, which for 700 years had always been used for the administration of the state. Parliament granted a fixed annual income from the Civil List. The resulting system required the annual State expenditure on the Monarchy to be decided by the Treasury and presented to House of Commons. Prior to abolition, the Civil List was fixed at £7.9 million annually for the decade 2001-10, the same amount as in 1991, with the reserve being consumed over the decade. In 2011 the Civil List was raised to £13.7 million. There were four funding sources: * The Civil List paid by the Exchequer * The Grant-in-Aid for Royal Travel paid by the Department for Transport * The Grant-in-Aid for Communications and Information paid by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport * The Grant-in-Aid for the Maintenance of the Royal Palaces paid by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (en)
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 33448046 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 739327777 (xsd:integer)
dbp:1stReading
  • 2011-06-30 (xsd:date)
dbp:2ndReading
  • 2011-07-14 (xsd:date)
dbp:3rdReading
  • 2011-07-14 (xsd:date)
dbp:consideredBy
dbp:introducedBy
  • Justine Greening and Lord Sassoon
dbp:longTitle
  • The Act makes changes to the way in which the monarchy is funded. It replaces the Civil List and other grants that support the Queen’s official duties with a new Sovereign Grant, based on a percentage of the profits of the Crown Estate. The new grant is designed to deliver at first a broadly similar level of finance in cash terms to what is available at present. There are mechanisms for adjusting the level in future, and for using any significant surplus as a means to reduce the grant. The Sovereign Grant is intended to be a typical government grant that will lead to the royal finances being audited by the National Audit Office, and subjected to full parliamentary scrutiny.
dbp:royalAssent
  • 2011-10-18 (xsd:date)
dbp:shortTitle
  • Sovereign Grant Act 2011
dbp:status
  • in force
dct:subject
http://purl.org/linguistics/gold/hypernym
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • In 1760 King George III agreed with Parliament that he was no longer to govern in person, and therefore was no longer entitled to income from the Crown Estate, which for 700 years had always been used for the administration of the state. Parliament granted a fixed annual income from the Civil List. The resulting system required the annual State expenditure on the Monarchy to be decided by the Treasury and presented to House of Commons. Prior to abolition, the Civil List was fixed at £7.9 million annually for the decade 2001-10, the same amount as in 1991, with the reserve being consumed over the decade. In 2011 the Civil List was raised to £13.7 million. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Sovereign Grant Act 2011 (en)
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