In the card game of contract bridge, partners defending against a contract may play particular cards in a manner which gives a coded meaning or signal to guide their subsequent card play; also referred to as carding. Signals are usually given with the cards from the two-spot to the nine-spot. There are three types of signals: The methods used for each type of signal have evolved over time and fall into two broad categories:

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • In the card game of contract bridge, partners defending against a contract may play particular cards in a manner which gives a coded meaning or signal to guide their subsequent card play; also referred to as carding. Signals are usually given with the cards from the two-spot to the nine-spot. There are three types of signals: * attitude signals, the most frequently used, to encourage or discourage continuation of the suit led by partner * count signals, showing either an even or odd number of cards held in the suit led and * suit preference signals, the least frequently used, indicating partiality for a specific side suit. The methods used for each type of signal have evolved over time and fall into two broad categories: * standard signals where a high card or one followed by a lower card is encouraging when an attitude signal and showing an even number of cards when a count signal; and * reverse or upside down signals where the meanings are reversed, i.e. a low card or one followed by a higher card is encouraging when an attitude signal and showing an even number of cards when a count signal. Partnerships decide on which methods to adopt and must disclose them to their opponents. Use and interpretation is dependent upon their context, i.e. the contract, the auction, the opening lead or prior play, the cards visible in dummy, the cards visible in one's hand, who has led to the current trick and whether following suit or discarding. Accordingly, partnerships generally have an order of precedence for the interpretation of signals such as that indicated in the adjacent table. In the vast majority of cases, the third-hand follow-suit signal is an attitude signal, but when the attitude signal does not apply, it is a count signal. Usually, it is relatively easy to recognize a signal correctly when the declarer leads – either a count signal when following suit, or an attitude signal when discarding, and when they do not apply, it is a suit-preference signal. While signals are a means of permissible communication between defenders, they are considered as providing guiding information to partner and are not absolutely binding on him; partner may proceed otherwise as he deems rationally appropriate. Because declarer is entitled to know the meaning of all partnership agreements, including defenders' signals, he also is privy to the information being exchanged; this may give way to tactics by the defenders. (en)
  • Au bridge les défenseurs peuvent choisir des cartes particulières à jouer pour communiquer un signal. L'ensemble des techniques mises en œuvre pour transmettre cette information est appelée signalisation. (fr)
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 492394 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 736758776 (xsd:integer)
dct:subject
rdfs:comment
  • Au bridge les défenseurs peuvent choisir des cartes particulières à jouer pour communiquer un signal. L'ensemble des techniques mises en œuvre pour transmettre cette information est appelée signalisation. (fr)
  • In the card game of contract bridge, partners defending against a contract may play particular cards in a manner which gives a coded meaning or signal to guide their subsequent card play; also referred to as carding. Signals are usually given with the cards from the two-spot to the nine-spot. There are three types of signals: The methods used for each type of signal have evolved over time and fall into two broad categories: (en)
rdfs:label
  • Signal (bridge) (en)
  • Signaler (bridge) (fr)
owl:sameAs
prov:wasDerivedFrom
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is foaf:primaryTopic of