"Short People" is a song by Randy Newman from his 1977 album, Little Criminals. The verses and chorus are lyrically constructed as a prejudiced attack on short people. In contrast, the bridge states that "short people are just the same as you and I." Newman interprets the song to be about "prejudice" as was widely thought, but added that it was "about a lunatic". As with many of his songs such as "Rednecks", Newman wrote the song from the point of view of a biased narrator. Like Dire Straits' 1985 hit single, "Money for Nothing", which used the same lyrical technique, the song was misunderstood by many listeners who wrongly assumed that it reflected Newman's personal viewpoint.

Property Value
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  • 2.9
dbo:abstract
  • "Short People" is a song by Randy Newman from his 1977 album, Little Criminals. The verses and chorus are lyrically constructed as a prejudiced attack on short people. In contrast, the bridge states that "short people are just the same as you and I." Newman interprets the song to be about "prejudice" as was widely thought, but added that it was "about a lunatic". As with many of his songs such as "Rednecks", Newman wrote the song from the point of view of a biased narrator. Like Dire Straits' 1985 hit single, "Money for Nothing", which used the same lyrical technique, the song was misunderstood by many listeners who wrongly assumed that it reflected Newman's personal viewpoint. Newman would later grow to dislike the song and its success, eventually calling it a "bad break", a "novelty record like The Chipmunks", and said it caused him to receive several threats regarding its misinterpreted message. However, it ended up being included on almost every one of his greatest hits albums. Although Newman had never charted a single before, and his previous album, Good Old Boys, had been his first to reach the Billboard 200, "Short People" soon gained attention as a novelty song. The song consequently became a major hit on radio peaking at No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 for three weeks; it was kept from reaching No. 1 by Player's "Baby Come Back" and the Bee Gees' "Stayin' Alive". It became a Gold record. The song follows a basic musical formula with bass and drums centering on Newman's catchy pop piano line in the key of A major. A small brass section and an electric guitar occasionally rise into the mix and conga drums (played by Los Angeles-based session musician Milt Holland) also feature prominently in the song. In 1978, state of Maryland delegate Isaiah Dixon attempted to introduce legislation making it illegal to play "Short People" on the radio. He was advised by Assistant Attorney General Francis B. Burch that such a law would be a violation of the First Amendment. (en)
  • 「ショート・ピープル」(原題:Short People)は、ランディ・ニューマンが1977年に発表した楽曲。 (ja)
  • "Short People" is een liedje van de Amerikaanse singer-songwriter Randy Newman, dat in 1977 als single werd uitgegeven door Warner Bros. Records. Het verscheen in dat jaar tevens als albumnummer op Little Criminals. Newman trachtte discriminatie en vooringenomenheid te ridiculiseren door in "Short People" kleine mensen op de hak te nemen, maar deze ironische benadering van Newman (die zelf 1,83 meter lang is) werd niet door iedereen begrepen. De ophef rond het liedje deed twee radiostations in Boston besluiten het niet meer te draaien. Tijdens de tournee ter gelegenheid van Little Criminals werd Newman met de dood bedreigd. Hij had niet verwacht dat "Short People" zo veel teweeg zou brengen: "I had no idea that anything that silly would be taken seriously." De grote hoeveelheid aandacht leidde echter wel tot een commercieel succes, met 750.000 verkochte exemplaren en een tweede plaats in de Billboard Hot 100. (nl)
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  • "Old Man On The Farm"
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  • Gold
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  • Short_People_-_Randy_Newman.jpg
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  • "The Blues"
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  • November 1977
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  • "Short People"
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http://purl.org/linguistics/gold/hypernym
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  • 「ショート・ピープル」(原題:Short People)は、ランディ・ニューマンが1977年に発表した楽曲。 (ja)
  • "Short People" is a song by Randy Newman from his 1977 album, Little Criminals. The verses and chorus are lyrically constructed as a prejudiced attack on short people. In contrast, the bridge states that "short people are just the same as you and I." Newman interprets the song to be about "prejudice" as was widely thought, but added that it was "about a lunatic". As with many of his songs such as "Rednecks", Newman wrote the song from the point of view of a biased narrator. Like Dire Straits' 1985 hit single, "Money for Nothing", which used the same lyrical technique, the song was misunderstood by many listeners who wrongly assumed that it reflected Newman's personal viewpoint. (en)
  • "Short People" is een liedje van de Amerikaanse singer-songwriter Randy Newman, dat in 1977 als single werd uitgegeven door Warner Bros. Records. Het verscheen in dat jaar tevens als albumnummer op Little Criminals. Newman trachtte discriminatie en vooringenomenheid te ridiculiseren door in "Short People" kleine mensen op de hak te nemen, maar deze ironische benadering van Newman (die zelf 1,83 meter lang is) werd niet door iedereen begrepen. De ophef rond het liedje deed twee radiostations in Boston besluiten het niet meer te draaien. Tijdens de tournee ter gelegenheid van Little Criminals werd Newman met de dood bedreigd. Hij had niet verwacht dat "Short People" zo veel teweeg zou brengen: "I had no idea that anything that silly would be taken seriously." De grote hoeveelheid aandacht le (nl)
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  • Short People (en)
  • ショート・ピープル (ja)
  • Short People (nl)
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  • Short People (en)
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