The Protection of Person and Property Act 1881 was one of more than 100 Coercion Acts passed by the Parliament of United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland between 1801 and 1922, in an attempt to establish law and order in Ireland. The 1881 Act was passed by parliament and introduced by Gladstone. It allowed for persons to be imprisoned without trial. On 13 October 1881, the Act was used to arrest Charles Stewart Parnell after his newspaper, the United Ireland, had attacked the Land Act:

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  • Les Irish Coercion Acts sont une série de lois britanniques étalées de 1801 à 1922 destinées au « rétablissement de l'ordre » en Irlande. Elles furent parmi les lois les plus critiquées de ce siècle. Le Coercion Act de 1817 abolit l’Habeas corpus. En 1844-1847, Robert Peel échoua à en faire voter une nouvelle dans le cadre de la famine de la pomme de terre. Les Coercion Acts les plus célèbres et les plus stricts furent ceux votés en 1881du temps du gouvernement Gladstone. Ils furent aussi les plus critiqués et une des causes du Bloody Sunday (1887). * Portail du Royaume-Uni Portail du Royaume-Uni * Portail de l’Irlande Portail de l’Irlande * Portail du droit Portail du droit (fr)
  • The Protection of Person and Property Act 1881 was one of more than 100 Coercion Acts passed by the Parliament of United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland between 1801 and 1922, in an attempt to establish law and order in Ireland. The 1881 Act was passed by parliament and introduced by Gladstone. It allowed for persons to be imprisoned without trial. On 13 October 1881, the Act was used to arrest Charles Stewart Parnell after his newspaper, the United Ireland, had attacked the Land Act: An Act for the better Protection of Person and Property in Ireland Copy warrant to arrest Whereas by an order of the Lord-Lieutenant... by virtue of the Act... and of every power and authority in this behalf... the county of the city of Dublin should become a prescribed district and Charles Stewart Parnell ...suspected... guilty, as principal, of... inciting other[s] to intimidate divers persons to abstain from...namely to pay rents lawfully due...Command... to arrest said Charles Stewart Parnell...and lodge him in Kilmainham...during the continuance of the said Act unless sooner discharged or tried by our direction. (en)
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  • 723719907 (xsd:integer)
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  • 44 (xsd:integer)
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  • --01-24
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  • Parliament of the United Kingdom
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  • March 1881
dbp:shortTitle
  • Protection of Person and Property Act 1881
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  • Act
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  • yes
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  • 1881 (xsd:integer)
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  • The Protection of Person and Property Act 1881 was one of more than 100 Coercion Acts passed by the Parliament of United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland between 1801 and 1922, in an attempt to establish law and order in Ireland. The 1881 Act was passed by parliament and introduced by Gladstone. It allowed for persons to be imprisoned without trial. On 13 October 1881, the Act was used to arrest Charles Stewart Parnell after his newspaper, the United Ireland, had attacked the Land Act: (en)
  • Les Irish Coercion Acts sont une série de lois britanniques étalées de 1801 à 1922 destinées au « rétablissement de l'ordre » en Irlande. Elles furent parmi les lois les plus critiquées de ce siècle. Le Coercion Act de 1817 abolit l’Habeas corpus. En 1844-1847, Robert Peel échoua à en faire voter une nouvelle dans le cadre de la famine de la pomme de terre. Les Coercion Acts les plus célèbres et les plus stricts furent ceux votés en 1881du temps du gouvernement Gladstone. Ils furent aussi les plus critiqués et une des causes du Bloody Sunday (1887). (fr)
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  • Protection of Person and Property Act 1881 (en)
  • Irish Coercion Acts (fr)
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