In Canada, a penny is a coin worth one cent, or  1⁄100 of a dollar. According to the Royal Canadian Mint, the official national term of the coin is the "one-cent piece", but in practice the terms penny and cent predominate. Originally, "penny" referred to a two-cent coin. When the two-cent coin was discontinued, penny took over as the new one-cent coin's name. Penny was likely readily adopted because the previous coinage in Canada (up to 1858) was the British monetary system, where Canada used British pounds, shillings, and pence as coinage alongside U.S. decimal coins and Spanish milled dollars.

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  • In Canada, a penny is a coin worth one cent, or  1⁄100 of a dollar. According to the Royal Canadian Mint, the official national term of the coin is the "one-cent piece", but in practice the terms penny and cent predominate. Originally, "penny" referred to a two-cent coin. When the two-cent coin was discontinued, penny took over as the new one-cent coin's name. Penny was likely readily adopted because the previous coinage in Canada (up to 1858) was the British monetary system, where Canada used British pounds, shillings, and pence as coinage alongside U.S. decimal coins and Spanish milled dollars. In Canadian French, the penny is called a cent, which is spelled the same way as the French word for "hundred" but pronounced like the English word (homonym to "sent"). Slang terms include cenne, cenne noire, or sou noir (black penny), although common Quebec French usage is sou. Production of the penny ceased in May 2012, and the Royal Canadian Mint ceased the distribution of them as of February 4, 2013. However, like all discontinued currency in the Canadian monetary system, the coin remains legal tender. Once distribution of the coin ceased, though, vendors no longer were expected to return pennies as change for cash purchases, and were encouraged to round purchases to the nearest five cents. Non-cash transactions are still denominated to the cent. (en)
  • Au Canada, un cent, aussi appelé sou, était une pièce de monnaie qui représentait 1/100 d'un dollar. Au Québec, au Nouveau-Brunswick et en Ontario, le cent est aussi appelé « une cenne » par les francophones. (fr)
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  • 1560173 (xsd:integer)
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  • CC 20
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  • 1.500000 (xsd:double)
  • 4.500000 (xsd:double)
  • 94 (xsd:integer)
dbp:country
  • Canada
dbp:denomination
  • Penny
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  • 2013 (xsd:integer)
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  • 19.050000 (xsd:double)
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  • A 1902 penny featuring King Edward VII
  • A 1911 penny featuring King George V
  • A 1937 penny featuring King George VI
  • An 1876 penny featuring Queen Victoria
  • A 1920 penny featuring King George V, the first year of the small penny
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  • CANADA, GEORGE VI 1937 -ONE CENT a - Flickr - woody1778a.jpg
  • CANADA, VICTORIA 1876 -ONE CENT a - Flickr - woody1778a.jpg
  • CANADA, VICTORIA 1876 -ONE CENT b - Flickr - woody1778a.jpg
  • CANADA, GEORGE V 1911 -ONE CENT a - Flickr - woody1778a.jpg
  • CANADA, GEORGE V 1920 -FIRST ISSUE, SMALL ONE CENT b - Flickr - woody1778a.jpg
  • CANADA, GEORGE V 1911 -ONE CENT b - Flickr - woody1778a.jpg
  • CANADA, EDWARD VII, 1902 -ONE CENT a - Flickr - woody1778a.jpg
  • CANADA, EDWARD VII, 1902 -ONE CENT b - Flickr - woody1778a.jpg
  • CANADA, GEORGE V 1920 -FIRST ISSUE, SMALL ONE CENT a - Flickr - woody1778a.jpg
  • CANADA, GEORGE VI 1937 -ONE CENT b - Flickr - woody1778a.jpg
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  • 2.350000 (xsd:double)
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  • Canadian Penny - Obverse.png
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  • 2003 (xsd:integer)
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  • Canadian Penny - Reverse.png
dbp:reverseDesign
  • Maple leaf branch
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  • 1937 (xsd:integer)
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  • 1.450000 (xsd:double)
dbp:title
  • List of the mintage of every year
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  • left
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  • 0.010000 (xsd:double)
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  • 100 (xsd:integer)
dbp:yearsOfMinting
  • 1858 (xsd:integer)
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http://purl.org/linguistics/gold/hypernym
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rdfs:comment
  • Au Canada, un cent, aussi appelé sou, était une pièce de monnaie qui représentait 1/100 d'un dollar. Au Québec, au Nouveau-Brunswick et en Ontario, le cent est aussi appelé « une cenne » par les francophones. (fr)
  • In Canada, a penny is a coin worth one cent, or  1⁄100 of a dollar. According to the Royal Canadian Mint, the official national term of the coin is the "one-cent piece", but in practice the terms penny and cent predominate. Originally, "penny" referred to a two-cent coin. When the two-cent coin was discontinued, penny took over as the new one-cent coin's name. Penny was likely readily adopted because the previous coinage in Canada (up to 1858) was the British monetary system, where Canada used British pounds, shillings, and pence as coinage alongside U.S. decimal coins and Spanish milled dollars. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Penny (Canadian coin) (en)
  • Pièce de 1 cent de dollar canadien (fr)
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