A one-bit message is a type of communication that has no personalized or specified content, and as such transmits only a single binary bit of information. It signals an intent and a thought, but does not specify what it is. Marc Andreessen describes "one-bit communication" as having no content other than that it exists. Examples of one-bit messages in the real world include the sound of car horns, police sirens, and “open” signs. Telephone calls which are deliberately terminated before being answered are also an example of one-bit communication.

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dbo:abstract
  • A one-bit message is a type of communication that has no personalized or specified content, and as such transmits only a single binary bit of information. It signals an intent and a thought, but does not specify what it is. Marc Andreessen describes "one-bit communication" as having no content other than that it exists. Examples of one-bit messages in the real world include the sound of car horns, police sirens, and “open” signs. Telephone calls which are deliberately terminated before being answered are also an example of one-bit communication. (en)
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http://purl.org/linguistics/gold/hypernym
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  • A one-bit message is a type of communication that has no personalized or specified content, and as such transmits only a single binary bit of information. It signals an intent and a thought, but does not specify what it is. Marc Andreessen describes "one-bit communication" as having no content other than that it exists. Examples of one-bit messages in the real world include the sound of car horns, police sirens, and “open” signs. Telephone calls which are deliberately terminated before being answered are also an example of one-bit communication. (en)
rdfs:label
  • One-bit message (en)
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