Francis Marion Campbell (May 25, 1929 – July 13, 2016) was an American football defensive lineman and coach. He played college football for the Georgia Bulldogs from 1949 until 1951, where he was appropriately nicknamed "Swamp Fox". During his National Football League (NFL) playing career, he played for the San Francisco 49ers (1954–1955) and the Philadelphia Eagles (1956–1961), winning Pro Bowl honors in 1959 and 1960 and also being named 1st team All-Pro in 1960 as part of the Eagles' championship team that year. He was one of the last of the NFL's "two-way" players who played all offensive and defensive snaps in a game.

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dbo:abstract
  • Francis Marion Campbell (May 25, 1929 – July 13, 2016) was an American football defensive lineman and coach. He played college football for the Georgia Bulldogs from 1949 until 1951, where he was appropriately nicknamed "Swamp Fox". During his National Football League (NFL) playing career, he played for the San Francisco 49ers (1954–1955) and the Philadelphia Eagles (1956–1961), winning Pro Bowl honors in 1959 and 1960 and also being named 1st team All-Pro in 1960 as part of the Eagles' championship team that year. He was one of the last of the NFL's "two-way" players who played all offensive and defensive snaps in a game. Campbell was head coach of the Atlanta Falcons (twice) and Philadelphia Eagles as well as the defensive coordinator for each team separate from his times as head coach. He also served as defensive line coach for the Boston Patriots (1962–1963), Minnesota Vikings (1964–1966), and the Los Angeles Rams (1967–1968). He was an expert in the 3–4 defense; his Eagles defenses ranked first in the league in points allowed in 1980 and 1981, and second and first in yards allowed. Campbell has the third lowest winning percentage among head coaches who have coached more than three seasons in the NFL. The only coaches below him are Bert Bell and David Shula. Campbell spent the 1994 season as the defensive coordinator for his alma mater Georgia Bulldogs. (en)
dbo:birthDate
  • 1929-5-25
dbo:deathDate
  • 2016-7-13
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  • 46
dbo:draftRound
  • 4
dbo:draftYear
  • 1952-01-01 (xsd:date)
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  • 737052864 (xsd:integer)
dbp:birthDate
  • 1929-05-25 (xsd:date)
dbp:birthName
  • Francis Marion Campbell
dbp:birthPlace
  • Chester, South Carolina, United States
dbp:caption
  • Campbell on a 1955 Bowman football card
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  • 0 (xsd:integer)
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  • 34 (xsd:integer)
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  • 34 (xsd:integer)
dbp:college
dbp:deathDate
  • 2016-07-13 (xsd:date)
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  • Plano, Texas, United States
dbp:highlights
  • * Pro Bowl honors in 1959 and 1960 * 1st team All-Pro in 1960
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  • 175 (xsd:integer)
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  • marioncampbell/2510971
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  • * Atlanta Falcons
  • * Philadelphia Eagles
  • * Georgia Bulldogs
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  • CampMa0
dct:description
  • American football player (en)
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http://purl.org/linguistics/gold/hypernym
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Francis Marion Campbell (May 25, 1929 – July 13, 2016) was an American football defensive lineman and coach. He played college football for the Georgia Bulldogs from 1949 until 1951, where he was appropriately nicknamed "Swamp Fox". During his National Football League (NFL) playing career, he played for the San Francisco 49ers (1954–1955) and the Philadelphia Eagles (1956–1961), winning Pro Bowl honors in 1959 and 1960 and also being named 1st team All-Pro in 1960 as part of the Eagles' championship team that year. He was one of the last of the NFL's "two-way" players who played all offensive and defensive snaps in a game. (en)
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  • Marion Campbell (en)
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  • male (en)
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  • Marion Campbell (en)
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  • Campbell (en)
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