In 1906, a young black man named Ed Johnson was murdered by a lynch mob in his home town of Chattanooga, Tennessee. He had been sentenced to death for the rape of Nevada Taylor, but Justice John Marshall Harlan of the United States Supreme Court had issued a stay of execution. To prevent delay or avoidance of execution, a mob broke into the jail where Johnson was held and lynched him. Johnson was the second African American to be lynched on Walnut Street Bridge, Alfred Blount being the first thirteen years earlier in 1893.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • In 1906, a young black man named Ed Johnson was murdered by a lynch mob in his home town of Chattanooga, Tennessee. He had been sentenced to death for the rape of Nevada Taylor, but Justice John Marshall Harlan of the United States Supreme Court had issued a stay of execution. To prevent delay or avoidance of execution, a mob broke into the jail where Johnson was held and lynched him. During Johnson's incarceration there was much public interest in the case, and many people including court officers feared a possible lynch attempt. The day after his murder saw widespread strikes among the black community in Chattanooga. Two thousand people attended his funeral on the next day. Following the murder, President Roosevelt made it his goal to have the members of the mob put in jail by getting the secret service men in on the investigation. Sheriff Joseph Shipp, who had arrested Johnson, was found guilty of contempt of court in United States v. Shipp, the only criminal trial ever held by the United States Supreme Court. Johnson while in jail, made a Christian profession and was baptized. He publicly forgave those who were about to kill him. On Johnson's tombstone are his final words "God Bless you all. I AM A Innocent Man." at the top. On the bottom is written "Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord" Johnson was the second African American to be lynched on Walnut Street Bridge, Alfred Blount being the first thirteen years earlier in 1893. (en)
dbo:thumbnail
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 24812290 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 721864088 (xsd:integer)
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • In 1906, a young black man named Ed Johnson was murdered by a lynch mob in his home town of Chattanooga, Tennessee. He had been sentenced to death for the rape of Nevada Taylor, but Justice John Marshall Harlan of the United States Supreme Court had issued a stay of execution. To prevent delay or avoidance of execution, a mob broke into the jail where Johnson was held and lynched him. Johnson was the second African American to be lynched on Walnut Street Bridge, Alfred Blount being the first thirteen years earlier in 1893. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Lynching of Ed Johnson (en)
owl:sameAs
prov:wasDerivedFrom
foaf:depiction
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is foaf:primaryTopic of