Lydia Rabinowitsch-Kempner (August 22, 1871 – August 3, 1935) was a Lithuanian-American bacteriologist and physician, known for her research on tuberculosis and public health. Lydia Rabinowitsch was born at Kovno, Russian Empire (now Kaunas, Lithuania). She was educated at the girls' gymnasium of her native city, and privately in Latin and Greek, subsequently studying natural sciences at the universities of Zurich and Bern (MD). After graduation she went to Berlin, where Professor Robert Koch permitted her to pursue her bacteriological studies at the Institute for Infectious Diseases. She became the second woman in Prussia employed as a professor, and the first in Berlin. In 1895 she went to Philadelphia, where she was appointed lecturer and, subsequently, professor at the Woman's Medical

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  • Lydia Rabinowitsch-Kempner (* 22. August 1871 in Kowno; † 3. August 1935 in Berlin; geborene Lydia Rabinowitsch) war eine deutsche Mikrobiologin. Ihr wurde als zweiter Frau in Preußen und als erster in Berlin der Professorentitel verliehen. Sie gab außerdem als erste Frau mit der Zeitschrift für Tuberkulose eine Fachzeitschrift heraus und wies die Übertragung der Tuberkelbazillen durch infizierte Kuhmilch nach. Im Jahr 1920 übernahm Rabinowitsch-Kempner das Bakteriologische Institut am Städtischen Krankenhaus Moabit, wurde jedoch auf Grund ihrer jüdischen Herkunft 1934 zwangspensioniert. (de)
  • Lydia Rabinowitsch-Kempner (August 22, 1871 – August 3, 1935) was a Lithuanian-American bacteriologist and physician, known for her research on tuberculosis and public health. Lydia Rabinowitsch was born at Kovno, Russian Empire (now Kaunas, Lithuania). She was educated at the girls' gymnasium of her native city, and privately in Latin and Greek, subsequently studying natural sciences at the universities of Zurich and Bern (MD). After graduation she went to Berlin, where Professor Robert Koch permitted her to pursue her bacteriological studies at the Institute for Infectious Diseases. She became the second woman in Prussia employed as a professor, and the first in Berlin. In 1895 she went to Philadelphia, where she was appointed lecturer and, subsequently, professor at the Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania. There she founded a bacteriological institute, though still continuing her studies every summer under Professor Koch. In 1896 she delivered before the International Congress of Women at Berlin a lecture on the study of medicine by women in various countries. At the congress of scientists held at Breslau in 1904 she presided over the section for hygiene and bacteriology. In 1898 she married Dr. Walter Kempner of Berlin. Their son was the jurist Robert Kempner (1899-1993). She died in 1935 in Berlin, aged 63, from undisclosed causes. (en)
  • リディア・ラビノヴィッチ=ケンプナー(Lydia Rabinowitsch-Kempner、1871年8月22日 - 1935年8月3日)は、ロシア(リトアニア)生まれのドイツの細菌学者である。 (ja)
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  • 1871-8-22
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  • 1935-8-3
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  • 3736660 (xsd:integer)
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  • 730533069 (xsd:integer)
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  • American biologist (en)
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http://purl.org/linguistics/gold/hypernym
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  • Lydia Rabinowitsch-Kempner (* 22. August 1871 in Kowno; † 3. August 1935 in Berlin; geborene Lydia Rabinowitsch) war eine deutsche Mikrobiologin. Ihr wurde als zweiter Frau in Preußen und als erster in Berlin der Professorentitel verliehen. Sie gab außerdem als erste Frau mit der Zeitschrift für Tuberkulose eine Fachzeitschrift heraus und wies die Übertragung der Tuberkelbazillen durch infizierte Kuhmilch nach. Im Jahr 1920 übernahm Rabinowitsch-Kempner das Bakteriologische Institut am Städtischen Krankenhaus Moabit, wurde jedoch auf Grund ihrer jüdischen Herkunft 1934 zwangspensioniert. (de)
  • リディア・ラビノヴィッチ=ケンプナー(Lydia Rabinowitsch-Kempner、1871年8月22日 - 1935年8月3日)は、ロシア(リトアニア)生まれのドイツの細菌学者である。 (ja)
  • Lydia Rabinowitsch-Kempner (August 22, 1871 – August 3, 1935) was a Lithuanian-American bacteriologist and physician, known for her research on tuberculosis and public health. Lydia Rabinowitsch was born at Kovno, Russian Empire (now Kaunas, Lithuania). She was educated at the girls' gymnasium of her native city, and privately in Latin and Greek, subsequently studying natural sciences at the universities of Zurich and Bern (MD). After graduation she went to Berlin, where Professor Robert Koch permitted her to pursue her bacteriological studies at the Institute for Infectious Diseases. She became the second woman in Prussia employed as a professor, and the first in Berlin. In 1895 she went to Philadelphia, where she was appointed lecturer and, subsequently, professor at the Woman's Medical (en)
rdfs:label
  • Lydia Rabinowitsch-Kempner (de)
  • Lydia Rabinowitsch-Kempner (en)
  • リディア・ラビノヴィッチ=ケンプナー (ja)
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  • Lydia (en)
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  • Lydia Rabinowitsch-Kempner (en)
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  • Rabinowitsch-Kempner (en)
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