Lawrence Earl Wiezel (April 29, 1915 – April 5, 2005), known professionally as Lawrence Earl, was a Canadian journalist and novelist. He is best known for his novels Yangtse Incident, which was adapted into the 1957 film Yangtse Incident: The Story of H.M.S. Amethyst, and The Battle of Baltinglass, which won the 1953 Stephen Leacock Award. Following his wife Jane's death, Earl created the Jane Armstrong Earl Fund through the Greater Saint John Community Foundation. He received an honorary doctorate from the University of New Brunswick in 2001. He died on April 5, 2005 in Saint John.

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  • Lawrence Earl Wiezel (April 29, 1915 – April 5, 2005), known professionally as Lawrence Earl, was a Canadian journalist and novelist. He is best known for his novels Yangtse Incident, which was adapted into the 1957 film Yangtse Incident: The Story of H.M.S. Amethyst, and The Battle of Baltinglass, which won the 1953 Stephen Leacock Award. Born and raised in Saint John, New Brunswick, Earl worked as a journalist for the Montreal Standard, including a stint as a war correspondent and photojournalist in Europe during World War II. While working for the Standard, he met and married Jane Armstrong, who was herself one of Canada's first women war correspondents. In 1948, he published a photo essay, "Mending Dikes in the Netherlands", in National Geographic, and his photo of Queen Juliana appeared on the cover of TIME. He then took a job with the British magazine Illustrated; he and his family resided in London, England for the remainder of Earl's professional career, although they often returned to a family home in Grand Bay–Westfield near Saint John in the summer. While living in London, Earl published both novels and non-fiction books, including Yangtse Incident (1950), The Battle of Baltinglass (1952), Crocodile Fever (1954), The Frozen Jungle (1955), She Loved a Wicked City (1962), The Riddle of a Haunted River (1962) and Risk (1969). Following his wife Jane's death, Earl created the Jane Armstrong Earl Fund through the Greater Saint John Community Foundation. He received an honorary doctorate from the University of New Brunswick in 2001. He died on April 5, 2005 in Saint John. (en)
dbo:activeYearsEndYear
  • 1960-01-01 (xsd:date)
dbo:activeYearsStartYear
  • 1950-01-01 (xsd:date)
dbo:birthDate
  • 1915-04-29 (xsd:date)
  • 1915-4-29
dbo:birthPlace
dbo:deathDate
  • 2005-04-05 (xsd:date)
  • 2005-4-5
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  • 42004714 (xsd:integer)
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  • 724123438 (xsd:integer)
dbp:nationality
  • Canadian
dbp:notableworks
  • Yangtse Incident, The Battle of Baltinglass
dbp:occupation
  • photojournalist, novelist
dct:description
  • Canadian writer (en)
dct:subject
http://purl.org/linguistics/gold/hypernym
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Lawrence Earl Wiezel (April 29, 1915 – April 5, 2005), known professionally as Lawrence Earl, was a Canadian journalist and novelist. He is best known for his novels Yangtse Incident, which was adapted into the 1957 film Yangtse Incident: The Story of H.M.S. Amethyst, and The Battle of Baltinglass, which won the 1953 Stephen Leacock Award. Following his wife Jane's death, Earl created the Jane Armstrong Earl Fund through the Greater Saint John Community Foundation. He received an honorary doctorate from the University of New Brunswick in 2001. He died on April 5, 2005 in Saint John. (en)
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  • Lawrence Earl (en)
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  • male (en)
foaf:givenName
  • Lawrence (en)
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foaf:name
  • Lawrence Earl (en)
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  • Earl (en)
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