Labor unions are legally recognized as representatives of workers in many industries in the United States. Their activity today centers on collective bargaining over wages, benefits, and working conditions for their membership, and on representing their members in disputes with management over violations of contract provisions. Larger unions also typically engage in lobbying activities and electioneering at the state and federal level.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Labor unions are legally recognized as representatives of workers in many industries in the United States. Their activity today centers on collective bargaining over wages, benefits, and working conditions for their membership, and on representing their members in disputes with management over violations of contract provisions. Larger unions also typically engage in lobbying activities and electioneering at the state and federal level. Most unions in the United States are aligned with one of two larger umbrella organizations: the AFL-CIO created in 1955, and the Change to Win Federation which split from the AFL-CIO in 2005. Both advocate policies and legislation on behalf of workers in the United States and Canada, and take an active role in politics. The AFL-CIO is especially concerned with global trade issues. In 2013 there were 14.5 million members in the U.S., compared with 17.7 million in 1983. In 2013, the percentage of workers belonging to a union in the United States (or total labor union "density") was 11.3%, compared to 20.1% in 1983. From a global perspective, the density in 2010 was 11.4% in the U.S., 18.4% in Germany, 27.5% in Canada, and 70% in Finland. Union membership in the private sector has fallen under 7% — levels not seen since 1932. In the 21st century the most prominent unions are among public sector employees such as city employees, government workers, teachers and police. Members of unions are disproportionately older, male, and residents of the Northeast, the Midwest, and California. Union workers average 10-30% higher pay than non-union in the United States after controlling for individual, job, and labor market characteristics. Although much smaller compared to their peak membership in the 1950s, American unions remain a political factor, both through mobilization of their own memberships and through coalitions with like-minded activist organizations around issues such as immigrant rights, trade policy, health care, and living wage campaigns. Of special concern are efforts by cities and states to reduce the pension obligations owed to unionized workers who retire in the future. Republicans elected with Tea Party support in 2010, most notably Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin, have launched major efforts against public sector unions due in part to state government pension obligations along with the allegation that the unions are too powerful. States with higher levels of union membership tend to have higher median incomes and standards of living. It has been asserted by scholars and the International Monetary Fund that rising income inequality in the United States is directly attributable to the decline of the labor movement and union membership. (en)
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  • 742603190 (xsd:integer)
dbp:country
  • United States
dbp:government
dbp:ilo87date
  • no
dbp:ilo98date
  • no
dbp:ilomember
  • yes
dbp:legislation
dbp:membershipNumber
  • 16200000 (xsd:integer)
dbp:national
dbp:unionPercentage
  • Demographics
  • maintenance: 15.3%
  • material moving: 14.8%
  • ▪ 25–34: 10.0%
  • ▪ 35–44: 13.0%
  • ▪ 45–54: 14.4%
  • ▪ 55–64: 14.9%
  • ▪ 65 and over: 10.4%
  • ▪ Age 16–24: 5.1%
  • ▪ Management, professional: 11.9%
  • ▪ Men: 11.7%
  • ▪ Natural resources, construction, and
  • ▪ Private sector: 6.6%
  • ▪ Production, transportation, and
  • ▪ Public sector: 35.7%
  • ▪ Sales and office: 6.5%
  • ▪ Service: 9.2%
  • ▪ Total: 11.1%
  • ▪ Women: 10.5%
dbp:unionPercentage1Title
  • Percentage of workforce;
dbp:unionPercentage2Title
dct:subject
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • Labor unions are legally recognized as representatives of workers in many industries in the United States. Their activity today centers on collective bargaining over wages, benefits, and working conditions for their membership, and on representing their members in disputes with management over violations of contract provisions. Larger unions also typically engage in lobbying activities and electioneering at the state and federal level. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Labor unions in the United States (en)
rdfs:seeAlso
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