Julia Nikolayevna Voznesenskaya (Russian: Юлия Николаевна Вознесенская), also known as Julia Toropovskaya - her maiden name, Julia Okulova - her husband's name, born on 14 September 1940 in Leningrad, is a Russian author of books with a Christian worldview. In 1976 Voznesenskaya was sentenced to four years of exile for Anti-Soviet Propaganda. In 1980 she emigrated to Germany. In 1996-1999 she lived in Lesninsky Russian Orthodox Convent in Chauvincourt-Provemont, Normandy, France. From 2002 until her death on 20 February 2015 she lived in Berlin.

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  • Julia Nikolayevna Voznesenskaya (Russian: Юлия Николаевна Вознесенская), also known as Julia Toropovskaya - her maiden name, Julia Okulova - her husband's name, born on 14 September 1940 in Leningrad, is a Russian author of books with a Christian worldview. In 1976 Voznesenskaya was sentenced to four years of exile for Anti-Soviet Propaganda. In 1980 she emigrated to Germany. In 1996-1999 she lived in Lesninsky Russian Orthodox Convent in Chauvincourt-Provemont, Normandy, France. From 2002 until her death on 20 February 2015 she lived in Berlin. Her works include The Star Chernobyl, about three sisters involved in the Chernobyl disaster; and her first novel, The Women's Decameron, about ten pregnant women in a maternity ward who are quarantined for ten days and - inspired by The Decameron - decide to tell ten stories each day, about life in 1980s Russia. My Posthumous Adventures (Мои посмертные приключения) is a fictional story of what her heroine experiences after clinical death. She is a laureate of the prizes Orthodox Christian Book of Russia (Православная книга России) and Alye Parusa (Crimson Sails). Her book series "The Yulianna" is sometimes classified as anti-Potter since it is a children's series that supports the Christian faith instead of witchcraft and magic. It tells the story of twin girls separated at birth and posits a Christian view of spiritual battle where angels and demons are real and prayer and Christian life or selfishness and giving in to temptation have real spiritual causes or results, and how prayer really can be 'magic'. Probably her most popular book is the first of a two-part series, called "Cassandra's Path, or Adventures with Macaroni", a science fiction apocalyptic view from the Christian perspective of the last days, and of one woman's journey to faith. In “100 Days before the Flood,” there remain another hundred days before the flood arrives. The ark is ready, but no one believes the prophecies: Noah’s neighbors laugh at him and build a money-making restaurant "Ark", enticing people to all sorts of earthly pleasures. Each of the characters has to make their own decision about where to direct their life and immortal soul: to the indulgence of the flesh or to the Kingdom of God. The historical novel "The Miracle at Edes" explores the legend of three early Greek Christians named Simon, Gury, and Aviv (the patrons of marriage in Greece). Their tale revolves around the exciting and even dangerous adventures of a newly married couple, with a spectacular twist ending. (en)
  • Ю́лия Вознесе́нская (настоящее имя Юлия Николаевна Окулова, урождённая Тараповская; 14 сентября 1940, Ленинград — 20 февраля 2015, Берлин) — советский и российский прозаик, поэт православного направления. (ru)
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  • 1940-9-14
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  • 2015-2-20
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  • Russian writer (en)
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http://purl.org/linguistics/gold/hypernym
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  • Ю́лия Вознесе́нская (настоящее имя Юлия Николаевна Окулова, урождённая Тараповская; 14 сентября 1940, Ленинград — 20 февраля 2015, Берлин) — советский и российский прозаик, поэт православного направления. (ru)
  • Julia Nikolayevna Voznesenskaya (Russian: Юлия Николаевна Вознесенская), also known as Julia Toropovskaya - her maiden name, Julia Okulova - her husband's name, born on 14 September 1940 in Leningrad, is a Russian author of books with a Christian worldview. In 1976 Voznesenskaya was sentenced to four years of exile for Anti-Soviet Propaganda. In 1980 she emigrated to Germany. In 1996-1999 she lived in Lesninsky Russian Orthodox Convent in Chauvincourt-Provemont, Normandy, France. From 2002 until her death on 20 February 2015 she lived in Berlin. (en)
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  • Julia Voznesenskaya (en)
  • Вознесенская, Юлия Николаевна (ru)
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  • Julia Voznesenskaya (en)
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  • Voznesenskaya (en)
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