Instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) is an aviation flight category that describes weather conditions that require pilots to fly primarily by reference to instruments, and therefore under instrument flight rules (IFR), rather than by outside visual references under visual flight rules (VFR). Typically, this means flying in cloud or bad weather. Pilots sometimes train to fly in these conditions with the aid of products like Foggles, specialized glasses that restrict outside vision, forcing the student to rely on instrument indications only.

Property Value
dbo:abstract
  • Instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) is an aviation flight category that describes weather conditions that require pilots to fly primarily by reference to instruments, and therefore under instrument flight rules (IFR), rather than by outside visual references under visual flight rules (VFR). Typically, this means flying in cloud or bad weather. Pilots sometimes train to fly in these conditions with the aid of products like Foggles, specialized glasses that restrict outside vision, forcing the student to rely on instrument indications only. The weather conditions required for flight under VFR are known as visual meteorological conditions (VMC). IMC and VMC are mutually exclusive. In fact, instrument meteorological conditions are defined as less than the minima specified for visual meteorological conditions. The boundary criteria between VMC and IMC are known as the VMC minima. There is also a concept of "marginal VMC", which are certain conditions above VMC minima, which are fairly close to one or more of the VMC minima. With good visibility, pilots can determine the aircraft attitude by utilising visual cues from outside the aircraft, most significantly the horizon. Without such external visual cues, pilots must use an internal source of the attitude information, which is usually provided by gyroscopically-driven instruments such as the attitude indicator ("artificial horizon"). The availability of a good horizon cue is controlled by meteorological visibility, hence minimum visibility limits feature in the VMC minima. Visibility is also important to avoid terrain. Because the basic traffic avoidance principle of flying under visual flight rules (VFR) is to "see and avoid", it follows that distance from clouds is an important factor in the VMC minima: as aircraft flying in clouds cannot be seen, a buffer zone from clouds is required (to provide for time to react to an aircraft exiting the clouds). ICAO recommends the VMC minima internationally; they are defined in national regulations, which rarely significantly vary from ICAO. The main variation is in the units of measurement as different states use different units of measurement in aviation. The minima tend to be stricter in controlled airspace, where there is a lot of traffic therefore greater visibility and cloud clearance is desirable. The degree of separation provided by air traffic control is also a factor. For example, in class A and B airspace where all aircraft are provided with positive separation, the VMC minima feature visibility limits only, whereas in classes C–G airspace where some or all aircraft are not separated from each other by air traffic control, the VMC minima also feature cloud separation criteria. It is important not to confuse IMC with IFR (instrument flight rules) – IMC describes the actual weather conditions, while IFR describes the rules under which the aircraft is flying. Aircraft can (and often do) fly IFR in clear weather, for operational reasons or when flying in airspace where flight under VFR is not permitted; indeed by far the majority of commercial flights are operated solely under IFR. It is possible to be flying VFR in conditions that are legally considered VMC and have to rely on flight instruments for attitude control because there is no distinct external horizon, for example, on a dark night over water (which may create a so-called black hole effect) or a clear night with lights on the water and stars in the sky looking the same. (en)
  • Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) sind Flugwetterbedingungen, die das Fliegen nach Instrumenten und damit auch nach den Regeln für den Instrumentenflug (Instrument Flight Rules, IFR) erforderlich machen. Piloten müssen für das Fliegen nach Instrumentenflugregeln speziell ausgebildet und das Flugzeug entsprechend ausgerüstet sein. Ist mindestens eins von beidem nicht der Fall, kann ein Wetterwechsel von Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC), bei denen Fliegen nach Sichtflugregeln möglich ist, hin zu Instrumentenbedingungen, sehr gefährlich werden. Insbesondere fehlende Sicht auf den Horizont führt bei reinen VFR-Fliegern zu Desorientierung über Fluglage und Höhe, was zu falschen Steuereingaben, Kontrollverlust und schließlich zum Absturz führen kann. (de)
  • IMC signifie : « Instrument Meteorological Conditions », ce qui se traduit par : « conditions météorologiques de vol aux instruments ». (fr)
  • Instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) traducibile come condizioni meteorologiche per il volo strumentale è un termine usato nell'aviazione per descrivere condizioni meteorologiche che normalmente richiedono che il pilota voli principalmente con l'ausilio degli strumenti, quindi secondo le Regole del volo strumentale (IFR), piuttosto che tramite riferimenti visivi, cioè secondo le Regole del volo a vista (VFR). Le condizioni meteorologiche per volare in VFR sono conosciute anche come Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC). IMC e VMC sono naturalmente mutuamente esclusive. Il limite fra VMC e IMC è conosciuto come "minime VMC" . Con buona visibilità, i piloti possono determinare l'assetto dell'aereo utilizzando riferimenti visuali all'esterno dell'aereo, primo fra tutti l'orizzonte. In assenza di tali aiuti esterni, i piloti devono utilizzare aiuti interni, forniti da strumenti giroscopici come l'Indicatore di assetto (od "Orizzonte artificiale" ). La presenza di un buone condizioni è controllata tramite la visibilità meteorologica, da qui un limite di visibilità minima nelle minime VMC. La visibilità è anche importante per evitare il suolo. Dal momento che il principio basilare per evitare altri traffici in VFR è "Seen and to Be Seen" ("Vedere ed essere visti"), si deduce che anche la distanza dalle nubi è un fattore importante nelle minime VMC: visto che un velivolo nelle nubi non può essere visto, una zona cuscinetto di distanza dalle nubi è richiesta. L'ICAO raccomanda le minime VMC a livello internazionale; sono definite in regolamentazioni nazionali che raramente si discostano in maniera significativa da quelle ICAO. La differenza principale sta nell'unità di misura, poiché stati diversi utilizzano unità di misura diverse in campo aeronautico. Negli spazi aerei italiani, le minime condizioni VMC sono pubblicate da ENAV. È importante non confondere IMC con IFR. Le IMC descrivono la condizione meteorologica presente, mentre IFR descrive le regole secondo la quale il velivolo sta volando. Un velivolo può (e spesso lo fa) volare in IFR anche con un tempo splendido per motivi operativi, oppure quando vola in spazi aerei nei quali il volo VFR non è permesso; inoltre, la maggior parte dei voli commerciali operano esclusivamente in IFR. È possibile volare in condizioni VFR/VMC e dover affidarsi sugli strumenti di volo per controllare l'assetto. Un esempio è quando si vola di notte sul mare, in cui le stelle nel cielo e il loro riflesso si confondono e quindi l'orizzonte è difficilmente distinguibile. (it)
  • Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) ou Condições Meteorológicas por Instrumentos é o termo utilizado em aviação para informar que as as operações aéreas podem acontecer através das regras IFR ou por Instrumentos. Em oposição ao IMC não há o VMC. Deve-se lembrar que só existe IMC quando o grupo de nuvens apresentado na mensagem METAR está abaixo de 1500 pés de altura (valor menor que 015) e a quantidade de nuvens está cobrindo mais do que 5/8 do céu (BKN ou OVC). Outra situação de condições IMC é quando a visibilidade está abaixo de 5000 metros. Ex de METAR com condicoes IMC: METAR SBBI 211600Z 04005KT 9999 SCT008 BKN011 18/13 Q1019= (Nuvens de 5 a 7/8 abaixo de 1500 pés)SBJV 211600Z 01008KT 3000 BR SCT010 SCT035 21/20 Q1018= (Visibilidade inferior a 5000 metros devido a névoa úmida) (pt)
dbo:wikiPageExternalLink
dbo:wikiPageID
  • 1536627 (xsd:integer)
dbo:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 744542255 (xsd:integer)
dct:subject
http://purl.org/linguistics/gold/hypernym
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • IMC signifie : « Instrument Meteorological Conditions », ce qui se traduit par : « conditions météorologiques de vol aux instruments ». (fr)
  • Instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) is an aviation flight category that describes weather conditions that require pilots to fly primarily by reference to instruments, and therefore under instrument flight rules (IFR), rather than by outside visual references under visual flight rules (VFR). Typically, this means flying in cloud or bad weather. Pilots sometimes train to fly in these conditions with the aid of products like Foggles, specialized glasses that restrict outside vision, forcing the student to rely on instrument indications only. (en)
  • Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) sind Flugwetterbedingungen, die das Fliegen nach Instrumenten und damit auch nach den Regeln für den Instrumentenflug (Instrument Flight Rules, IFR) erforderlich machen. (de)
  • Instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) traducibile come condizioni meteorologiche per il volo strumentale è un termine usato nell'aviazione per descrivere condizioni meteorologiche che normalmente richiedono che il pilota voli principalmente con l'ausilio degli strumenti, quindi secondo le Regole del volo strumentale (IFR), piuttosto che tramite riferimenti visivi, cioè secondo le Regole del volo a vista (VFR). Le condizioni meteorologiche per volare in VFR sono conosciute anche come Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC). IMC e VMC sono naturalmente mutuamente esclusive. Il limite fra VMC e IMC è conosciuto come "minime VMC" . (it)
  • Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) ou Condições Meteorológicas por Instrumentos é o termo utilizado em aviação para informar que as as operações aéreas podem acontecer através das regras IFR ou por Instrumentos. Em oposição ao IMC não há o VMC. Deve-se lembrar que só existe IMC quando o grupo de nuvens apresentado na mensagem METAR está abaixo de 1500 pés de altura (valor menor que 015) e a quantidade de nuvens está cobrindo mais do que 5/8 do céu (BKN ou OVC). Outra situação de condições IMC é quando a visibilidade está abaixo de 5000 metros. Ex de METAR com condicoes IMC: (pt)
rdfs:label
  • Instrument meteorological conditions (en)
  • Instrument Meteorological Conditions (de)
  • Conditions météorologiques de vol aux instruments (fr)
  • Instrument Meteorological Conditions (it)
  • Instrument meteorological conditions (pt)
owl:sameAs
prov:wasDerivedFrom
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbo:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is dbo:wikiPageRedirects of
is foaf:primaryTopic of