IC codes or 6+1 codes are codes used by the British police in radio communications to describe the apparent ethnicity of a suspect. Originating in the late 1970s, the codes are based on a police officer's perceived view of an individual's ethnicity based on a visual assessment, as opposed to that individual's self-definition. In most circumstances where an individual's ethnicity is recorded after spoken contact with police (such as a "Stop and Search" or arrest), police are required to use the more extensive "16+1" Self Defined Ethnicity codes, "even if the category chosen is clearly at odds with the officer’s visual assessment".

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  • IC codes or 6+1 codes are codes used by the British police in radio communications to describe the apparent ethnicity of a suspect. Originating in the late 1970s, the codes are based on a police officer's perceived view of an individual's ethnicity based on a visual assessment, as opposed to that individual's self-definition. In most circumstances where an individual's ethnicity is recorded after spoken contact with police (such as a "Stop and Search" or arrest), police are required to use the more extensive "16+1" Self Defined Ethnicity codes, "even if the category chosen is clearly at odds with the officer’s visual assessment". The usage of IC codes in relation to individuals is recorded as part of information collected during activities including "stop and search", issuing of fixed penalties, arrest, and custody of individuals, and is recorded on a number of police databases. This is as required under section 95 of the Criminal Justice Act 1991, which states that: (1) The Secretary of State shall in each year publish such information as he considers expedient for the purpose of—(a) enabling persons engaged in the administration of criminal justice to become aware of the financial implications of their decisions;(b) facilitating the performance by such persons of their duty to avoid discriminating against any persons on the ground of race or sex or any other improper ground.— Criminal Justice Act 1991, section 95 "IC" itself stands for "Identity Code", so "IC code" is redundant, though still commonly used. The codes are also known as PNC or Phoenix Codes, or the 6+1 system. Other individuals involved in security and law enforcement, such as street wardens, Guardians (Cheltenham), City Guardians (Broad Street, Westminster City Council), Police Community Support Officers, security guards, and door supervisors, also use IC Codes on a regular basis. (en)
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  • IC codes or 6+1 codes are codes used by the British police in radio communications to describe the apparent ethnicity of a suspect. Originating in the late 1970s, the codes are based on a police officer's perceived view of an individual's ethnicity based on a visual assessment, as opposed to that individual's self-definition. In most circumstances where an individual's ethnicity is recorded after spoken contact with police (such as a "Stop and Search" or arrest), police are required to use the more extensive "16+1" Self Defined Ethnicity codes, "even if the category chosen is clearly at odds with the officer’s visual assessment". (en)
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  • IC codes (en)
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