The Hoko River Archeological Site complex, located in Clallam County in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Washington, is a 2,500-year-old fishing camp. Hydraulic excavation methods, which were first developed on the site, and artifacts found there have contributed to the understanding of the traditions and culture of the Makah people who have inhabited the northwest for 3,800 years. The site has also shed light on the evolution of food storage and the flora and fauna that existed in the area around 2500 B.P.. Its name comes from the Hoko River.

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dbo:abstract
  • The Hoko River Archeological Site complex, located in Clallam County in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Washington, is a 2,500-year-old fishing camp. Hydraulic excavation methods, which were first developed on the site, and artifacts found there have contributed to the understanding of the traditions and culture of the Makah people who have inhabited the northwest for 3,800 years. The site has also shed light on the evolution of food storage and the flora and fauna that existed in the area around 2500 B.P.. Its name comes from the Hoko River. (en)
dbo:added
  • 1978-03-21 (xsd:date)
  • 1980-03-27 (xsd:date)
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  • 78002735
  • 80003997
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  • Private
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  • Washington
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http://purl.org/linguistics/gold/hypernym
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  • The Hoko River Archeological Site complex, located in Clallam County in the northwestern part of the U.S. state of Washington, is a 2,500-year-old fishing camp. Hydraulic excavation methods, which were first developed on the site, and artifacts found there have contributed to the understanding of the traditions and culture of the Makah people who have inhabited the northwest for 3,800 years. The site has also shed light on the evolution of food storage and the flora and fauna that existed in the area around 2500 B.P.. Its name comes from the Hoko River. (en)
rdfs:label
  • Hoko River Archeological Site (en)
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  • Hoko River Archeological Site (en)
  • Hoko River Rockshelter Archeological Site (en)
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