Hawara is an archaeological site of Ancient Egypt, south of the site of Crocodilopolis (Arsinoe) at the entrance to the depression of the Fayyum oasis. The first excavations at the site were made by Karl Lepsius, in 1843.

PropertyValue
dbpedia-owl:abstract
  • Harawa è una località egiziana, nella regione del Fayyum sede di un'importante necropoli del Medio Regno. Ad Harawa si trova una delle due piramidi erette da Amenemhat III.
  • ハワーラのピラミッドは紀元前1800年頃、アメンエムハト3世がファイユーム盆地に造営したピラミッド。
  • Mapa de Egipto: Hawara. Hawara, o Hauara, es la principal ciudad de la región de El Fayum.
  • La pyramide de Hawara est la deuxième pyramide qu'Amenemhat III se fit édifier, la préférant, pour se faire ensevelir, à la première pyramide située à Dahchour. Elle fut explorée pour la première fois par William Petrie en 1888 et 1889. L'égyptologue a ainsi pu identifier le temple funéraire du complexe comme étant le célèbre labyrinthe, monument décrit avec enthousiasme par de nombreux voyageurs célèbres de l'antiquité comme Strabon et Hérodote. L'ensemble funéraire peut être considéré comme le chef-d'œuvre architectural du Moyen Empire.
  • Hawara ist der moderne Name einer altägyptischen Nekropole, die am Eingang zum Fayyum-Becken südöstlich von Medinet el-Fajum liegt.
  • Hawara is an archaeological site of Ancient Egypt, south of the site of Crocodilopolis (Arsinoe) at the entrance to the depression of the Fayyum oasis. The first excavations at the site were made by Karl Lepsius, in 1843. William Flinders Petrie excavated at Hawara, in 1888, finding papyri of the 1st and 2nd centuries CE, and, north of the pyramid, a vast necropolis where he found 146 portraits on coffins dating to the Roman period, famous as being among the very few surviving examples of painted portraits from Classical Antiquity, the "Fayoum portraits" illustrated in Roman history textbooks. Amenemhet III was the last powerful ruler of the 12th Dynasty, and the pyramid he built at Hawara (illustration, right) is believed to post-date the so-called "Black Pyramid" built by the same ruler at Dahshur. It is this that is believed to have been Amenemhet's final resting place. At Hawara there was also the intact (pyramid) tomb of Neferu-Ptah, daughter of Amenemhet III. This tomb was found about 2 km South of the king's pyramid. In common with the Middle Kingdom pyramids constructed after Amenemhet II, it was built of mudbrick round a core of limestone passages and burial chambers, and faced with limestone. Most of the facing stone was later pillaged for use in other buildings— a fate common to almost all of Egypt's pyramids— and today the pyramid is little more than an eroded, vaguely pyramidal mountain of mud brick, and of the once magnificent mortuary temple precinct formerly enclosed by a wall there is little left beyond the foundation bed of compacted sand and chips and shards of limestone. From the pyramid entrance a sloping passage way with steps runs down to a small room and a further short horizontal passage. In the roof of this horizontal passage there was a concealed sliding trapdoor weighing 20 tons. If this was found and opened a robber would find himself confronted by an empty passage at a right angle to the passage below, closed by wooden doors, or by a passage parallel to the passage below, carefully filled with mud and stone blocking. He would assume that the blocking concealed the entrance and waste time removing it (thereby increasing the likelihood of detection by the pyramid guardians). In fact there was a second 20-ton trapdoor in the roof of the empty passage, giving onto a second empty passage, also at a right angle to the first. This too had a 20-ton trapdoor giving onto a passage at a right angle to its predecessor (thus the interior of the pyramid was circled by these passages). However this passage ended in a large area of mud and stone blocking that presumably concealed the burial chamber. This, however, was a blind and merely filled a wide but shallow alcove. Two blind shafts in the floor, carefully filled with cut stone blocks, further wasted the robbers' time, for the real entrance to the burial chamber was even more carefully concealed and lay between the blind shafts and opposite the alcove. Despite these elaborate protective measures, Petrie found that none of the trapdoors had been slid into place and the wooden doors were open. Whether this indicated negligence on the part of the burial party, an intention to return and place further burials in the pyramid (when found there were two sarcophagii in the quartzite monolith described below and room for at least two more), or a deliberate action to facilitate robbery of the tomb, we cannot know. The burial chamber was made out of a single quartzite monolith which was lowered into a larger chamber lined with limestone. This monolithic slab weighed an estimated 110 tons according to Petrie. A course of brick was placed on the chamber to raise the ceiling then the chamber was covered with 3 quartzite slabs (estimated weight 45 tons each). Above the burial chamber were 2 relieving chambers. This was topped with 50 ton limestone slabs forming a pointed roof. Then an enormous arch of brick 3 feet thick was built over the pointed roof to support the core of the pyramid. The entrance to the pyramid is today flooded to a depth of 6 metres as a result of the waters from the Bahr el-Yusuf (Joseph's Canal) canal, which flows around two sides of the site and passes within 30m of the pyramid. The huge mortuary temple that originally stood adjacent to this pyramid is believed to have formed the basis of the complex of buildings with galleries and courtyards called a "labyrinth" by Herodotus (see quote at Labyrinth), and mentioned by Strabo and Diodorus Siculus. (There is no historicity to the assertion of Diodorus Siculus that this was the model for the labyrinth of Crete that Greeks imagined housed the Minotaur) The demolition of the "labyrinth" may date in part to the reign of Ptolemy II, under whom the Pharaonic city of Shedyt (Greek Crocodilopolis, the modern Medinet el-Fayum) was renamed to honour his sister-wife Arsinoë; a massive Ptolemaic building program at Arsinoe has been suggested as the ultimate destination of Middle Kingdom limestone columns and blocks removed from Hawara, and now lost. Queen Sobekneferu of the Twelfth dynasty also built at the complex. Her name meant "most beautiful of Sobek", the sacred crocodile. Among the discoveries made by Flinders Petrie were papyrus manuscripts, including a great papyrus scroll which contains parts of books 1 and 2 of the Iliad (the "Hawara Homer" of the Bodleian Library, Oxford).
  • Hawara är en arkeologisk plats från forntida Egypten som ligger i Faijum, cirka 100 kilometer söder om Kairo. Den ligger söder om Crocodilopolis (Arsinoe) vid början av sänkan till oasen i Faijum och är bland annat känd för Amenemhet IIIs pyramid. De första utgrävningarna i området gjordes av Karl Richard Lepsius 1843. William Flinders Petrie utforskade Hawara 1888 och fann papyrus från första och andra århundradet E. Kr. , och, norr om pyramiden, en stor nekropol där han fann 146 porträtt på kistor daterade från romartiden, de så kallade Fayyum-porträtten. Amenemhet III var den mäktigaste härskaren under Egyptens tolfte dynasti och pyramiden han lät bygga i Hawara tros vara ett senare verk en den "Svarta pyramiden" som han lät bygga i Dahshur och där tros vara Amenemhets slutliga gravplats. I Hawara finns även ytterligare en intakt pyramidgrav för hans dotter Neferu-Ptah ungefär 2 kilometer söder om konungens pyramid.
dbpedia-owl:thumbnail
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageExternalLink
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageID
  • 2755671 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageInLinkCount
  • 31 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageOutLinkCount
  • 40 (xsd:integer)
dbpedia-owl:wikiPageRevisionID
  • 544136968 (xsd:integer)
dbpprop:hasPhotoCollection
dcterms:subject
grs:point
  • 29.266666666666666 30.9
rdf:type
rdfs:comment
  • La pyramide de Hawara est la deuxième pyramide qu'Amenemhat III se fit édifier, la préférant, pour se faire ensevelir, à la première pyramide située à Dahchour. Elle fut explorée pour la première fois par William Petrie en 1888 et 1889. L'égyptologue a ainsi pu identifier le temple funéraire du complexe comme étant le célèbre labyrinthe, monument décrit avec enthousiasme par de nombreux voyageurs célèbres de l'antiquité comme Strabon et Hérodote.
  • Hawara is an archaeological site of Ancient Egypt, south of the site of Crocodilopolis (Arsinoe) at the entrance to the depression of the Fayyum oasis. The first excavations at the site were made by Karl Lepsius, in 1843.
  • Harawa è una località egiziana, nella regione del Fayyum sede di un'importante necropoli del Medio Regno. Ad Harawa si trova una delle due piramidi erette da Amenemhat III.
  • ハワーラのピラミッドは紀元前1800年頃、アメンエムハト3世がファイユーム盆地に造営したピラミッド。
  • Mapa de Egipto: Hawara. Hawara, o Hauara, es la principal ciudad de la región de El Fayum.
  • Hawara ist der moderne Name einer altägyptischen Nekropole, die am Eingang zum Fayyum-Becken südöstlich von Medinet el-Fajum liegt.
  • Hawara är en arkeologisk plats från forntida Egypten som ligger i Faijum, cirka 100 kilometer söder om Kairo. Den ligger söder om Crocodilopolis (Arsinoe) vid början av sänkan till oasen i Faijum och är bland annat känd för Amenemhet IIIs pyramid. De första utgrävningarna i området gjordes av Karl Richard Lepsius 1843. William Flinders Petrie utforskade Hawara 1888 och fann papyrus från första och andra århundradet E. Kr.
rdfs:label
  • Hawara
  • Hawara
  • Hawara
  • Pyramide de Hawara
  • Hawara
  • ハワーラのピラミッド
  • Hawara
owl:sameAs
geo:geometry
  • POINT(30.9 29.2667)
geo:lat
  • 29.266666 (xsd:float)
geo:long
  • 30.900000 (xsd:float)
http://www.w3.org/ns/prov#wasDerivedFrom
foaf:depiction
foaf:isPrimaryTopicOf
is dbpedia-owl:wikiPageDisambiguates of
is owl:sameAs of
is foaf:primaryTopic of